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Is World Ventures Right for You? Check Out This Handy Review

Back in high school, there was this dude in my class called Ron.

Now Ron was BIG into ancient Egypt. He loved that stuff.

That’s cool, everyone’s gotta have a passion.

Bruce was into Space, bigtime.

Me? I was into baseball.

The teachers were probably a bit happier with kids wanting to be archaeologists or physicists than some pie-in-the-sky baseball dream. But I didn’t care.

Ron’s camel.

Maybe there were right, though. Bruce went on to work for NASA. Nice.

And Ron? Well things were a bit different with Ron.

 

I hadn’t heard from him for a good few years.

 

This one night me and the boys were cutting the crap in the local bar.

 

Just a few drinks after a hard week, you know how it goes.

 

Then imagine my surprise when someone piped up with some new info on our old boy Ron.

 

No, he wasn’t leading expeditions into ancient Egypt.

 

But he WAS doing something to do with pyramids.

 

He was working for a PYRAMID SCHEME!

 

HAHA!

 

One of my other bros was laughing about how ironic that was, since he was so into ancient Egypt. I’m not sure it was irony, but then English wasn’t my passion either. It sure was funny though.

Bruce chilling.

Since I’d been working in internet marketing for a while now, I’d seen a lot of these come and go.

 

You see, I’d been making some good bank for a few years with Local Lead Generation. It’s as legit as they come. More on that later.

 

But the thing is, before I found Local Lead Generation, I’d tried a lot of duds.

Things you THINK are gonna take off, but never do.

 

So I’d seen a lot of these pyramid schemes. I’d seen a lot of people fail on them, too.

 

I was always kinda apprehensive about getting into them.

 

I’d seen how they sometimes preyed on desperate people. But I’d also seen people make good money from them.

 

So I wanted to know more about this scheme. It was called World Ventures. Nope, never heard of it either. It sure sounded pretty generic.

But I’d always been the kinda guy who didn’t like to rush to judgements.

 

Ron was one of the smartest guys in our class. He was also a decent bloke.

And apparently, he’d been making real bank with this.

 

We’re talking yacht money. Nice.

Living the dream!

 

So I decided to have a closer look into World Ventures. I was gonna start at the bottom without any prejudices. See if it works for normal people who DIDN’T get into it early like Ron did.

 

You see, I didn’t mind some of the marketing networks. They tend to call them MLM or MultiLevel Marketing. It’s all good if the products are quality and the people at the bottom (the late adopters) can still make money.

 

Was that the case with World Ventures? Read my World Ventures review to find out.

 

World Ventures Review

 

At the start, I thought it’d be a good idea to give Ron a heads up. I thought I could ask him a few questions and make sure he knew I was gonna be writing this review.

 

Trouble is, I was having a hard time getting hold of him.

 

I mean, we weren’t that close back in the day, but I still thought he’d talk to me.

 

I reached out to some of his closer friends. No luck.

 

I was starting to think he didn’t really want to talk about World Ventures.

 

I wondered why, but tried not to make any judgements.

 

It was no biggie, I mean maybe it’d be better if I just got into World Ventures without any prior knowledge. Like the real people who were just starting on this.

 

But wait a minute. I’m getting WAY ahead of myself here. We haven’t even covered the basics. What even IS World Ventures?

 

Let’s have a look…

 

World Ventures touts itself as a dream vacation provider. That’s all good, I can dig it.

Only instead of actually selling these vacations yourself, it turns out the main way to make money is by recruiting other salespeople. That’s kinda how most pyramid schemes work these days. Sorry. Most MLM networks, I meant. Ha!

 

Anyway, they’re not all bad. I wanted to know if World Ventures was one of the good ones. After all, Ron had been making big bucks, right?

 

World Ventures was founded in 2005, and it brought in nearly a billion in revenue in 2016. Nice.

 

They SAY they’ve got 500,000 employees—but this figure’s unconfirmed. I reckon they’re simply adding up the number of network salespeople that occasionally work for them. Maybe that have EVER worked for them. But again, this is unconfirmed as well. It’s just a hunch. I’m 100% on hunches half of the time.

 

So World Ventures was started by this dude Wayne Nugent, along with his buddy Mike Azcue. They SAY that they wanted to build the “Mary Kay of travel”—I found that blurb when I was Googling them. Trouble is, I don’t know who Mary Kay is. I guess that’s for another article. What I THINK they’re saying is that they wanna be successful. I get that. Don’t we all?

 

Anyway, things certainly got off to a good start for Wayne and Mike. Ernst and Young even nominated our boy Wayne to be entrepreneur of the year in 2010. So these aren’t the sort of scam artists you see running other networks. They’ve got traction and a reasonably amount of respect in industry circles.

 

But does that mean it’s a good idea signing up to be a World Ventures rep? I’m not sure.

 

Yes, the guys at the top are raking it in. Big respect to them for that. But what about guys like me who were just gonna start at the bottom and hopefully make some money? What about guys like you?

 

I’m sure that’s why you’re at this World Ventures review. After all, it’s too late to be one of the lucky ones who got in at the start. Guys like Ron. What happened to Ron, anyway? More on Ron later.

 

It hasn’t been completely plain-sailing for Mike and Wayne, either. They’ve made a ton of cash—but they’ve also been sued continuously. Even by the Norwegian Government.

These guys weren’t fans.

 

What were they sued for? Being a pyramid scheme, basically. Told you.

 

Should have known, since Ron was always into those Egyptians.

 

What does World Ventures Even sell?

 

We’ve got this far into the review and you still don’t really know what World Ventures are trying to pimp. It’s about travel, we get that, but what’s so special about it?

 

In a word… Nothing.

 

I mean, they’re offering discounts and other travel-based offers for a monthly fee. A lot of this stuff can be found on other big-name affiliate sites WITHOUT the monthly fee. You’re basically paying for discounts. Some of them are ok, but I wouldn’t say they’re REALLY worth singing up to a monthly plan for.

 

Look, it’s not scammy at this level. You won’t see me calling this a World Ventures scam. You pay your monthly fee, and you get some good discounts.

 

Some people might prefer to do this than spend hours finding these discounts individually. Time is money, right?

 

But when I looked a bit deeper into these offers they seemed even less attractive. They weren’t flexible at all with dates or anything like that. Basically, if you like an offer, you have to book it on their terms and the ability to customize things isn’t easy.

 

You can’t combine offers either, or save reward points to spend all at once. Things are pretty limited here. There are much better travel offer sites out there. Many of these you don’t have to pay for.

 

This is always one of my biggest problems with pyramid schemes like this. Sorry, MLM Networks. Keep making that mistake.

 

Basically, if the products are good, then what’s the problem? I don’t see one with using a network to promote stuff.

 

But when they products AREN’T good, that’s when I start to have second thoughts.

 

But the REAL problem with MLM networks like this is even bigger…

 

It’s that they’re really hard to make money with for people at the bottom of the pyramid.

 

So if the people buying these plans aren’t getting anything good, and the people selling them aren’t making any money. What’s the point? Answers on a postcard, please.

 

Oh yeah. I know what the point was—the people at the stop still continue to make money. Just nobody else gets any value at all from this stuff.

 

THAT’S why MLM networks are getting a bad rap these days.

 

So in order to become an affiliate with World Ventures, you gotta pay a signup fee and then a monthly fee. Most affiliate networks I’ve worked with are happy to let you in for free in return for promoting their products.

Problem is, because the products aren’t that great or easy to promote—the main way it seems like World Ventures makes any money is with these

membership plans. Yep, you got it—they make the bulk of their cash from their affiliates, rather than their actual products.

And when you realise that you’ve gotta pay for an even more costly affiliate membership in order to qualify for the best commissions, things get even harder.

I remember when i first got into affiliate marketing, I was stoked with how much content and help PROPER affiliates gave me. And when I started making sales, I started making money. I DID NOT have to pay them before I started making sales. And I qualified for higher commissions based on my performance, NOT how much I paid them. Spotting the difference here? That’s not how World Ventures works…

 

And while people are still making money from World Ventures (people like Ron)—there’s an income disclosure statement which makes for interesting reading.

Basically, it says that 80% of affiliates aren’t making any money from World Ventures. And that 99% of affiliates make less than $2,000 a year. For those of you thinking about quitting their day jobs for this—think again. For those who’ve ALREADY quit their day jobs for this—Ouch.

 

So nobody’s really making money from this anymore? Not the people at the bottom, anyway. And there are loads of legal issues associated with World Ventures? And the products people end up with aren’t that great? I think you know which way to go on this already.

 

And back to the product range. The problem with using this model to promote World Ventures is that you often get desperate salespeople who’re already out of pocket pushing low-quality products to people who don’t really want them. The hard sell. You got it. This leaves both parties unhappy. And that’s not a party I wanna be involved in. No cake, either.

 

So what happened to Ron? Ah yeah, our boy Ron.

He still wasn’t answering my calls. Ron, bro! We go way back.

 

I’d heard on the grapevine that he’d been taking a lot of heat from friends and family that he’d got involved in World Ventures. He’d made some nice cash, and bought some cool stuff. But things were drying up. Word was that he’d moved on to some more legit money-making ventures. Good for him.

 

But where does that leave the people further down the pyramid? I want my $200 signup fee back!

 

A bit later, I started finding some better ways to make money online.

What I realised was that these get rich quick schemes were often just that. Schemes.

 

To make actual money, you’ve normally gotta put a bit of work in. I know that doesn’t sound like fun to most of you. But that’s just the way it is.

I found this other cool gig called Local Lead Generation. It lets you set up your own lead generation business for real clients who pay well. It could be your first step towards that passive income deal you’ve always wanted. It was for me, anyway. You should check it out.

Are You Ready To Hear About Team National? Check Out One of the Best Team National Reviews Around

Are You Ready To Hear About Team National? Check Out One of the Best Team National Reviews Around

Hey, remember way back when you had to use your own phoneline to connect to the internet? And listen to those stupid noises for a few seconds every time it connected? 

Those were the days. I remember that too. 

 The internet sure has come a long way since then. I actually made my first few affiliate marketing bucks back in those days. I like to call them the Wild West days of the internet. It wasn’t ’til I started making bank with my new Local Lead Generation business that I started to love the NEW internet. 

 There was one other benefit to those old-school internet times. When you were surfing, your phoneline was blocked from annoying cold calls. 

 Yeah—I know those cold calls have kinda just been replaced by spam emails, but I really used to hate those things. 

 Since we live in the 21st Century—I’ve got a separate internet connection and phoneline. So I’ve started getting annoyed by those cold calls again. I don’t know why these guys bother. 

 No, I did NOT have any problems with my computer. 

 And no, I did NOT recently have a car accident. What is it with these people? 

 Then one day I got a call. These guys asked me if I’d heard about Team National and if I wanted a place. 

 I was like: wait… Me? 

 You want me to join the national team? Awesome! 

 Which sport?! 

 I know I’d played a bit of basketball in college. But I was never THAT good. I know they’re struggling for players these days. But come on. Surely you don’t want me to play for Team USA? 

No Team USA called up for me

No, they didn’t want me to play any sport for the national team. The USA national team or anyone else. Bummer.

They wanted me to sign up to some sort of sales network. I was gonna make loads of money. Or so they said.

Naturally, I thanked them for their time and hung up. Or, I just hung up.

I don’t get involved with ANYTHING that’s pitched over the phone like that. I don’t even know if it was the guys from Team National itself or someone else who’d got involved with the scheme. As I soon learned, that’s kinda how it works.

So I quickly forgot about Team National. A few months went by when I heard a colleague mention them too. He’d had a similar call, and was taking it a bit more seriously than I did.

I decided I needed to do a bit more research. I didn’t want this guy to lose any money. The more I heard about Team National, the more fishy this “money-making opportunity sounded.”

So if you’re looking for one of the best Team National reviews you can find—then keep reading to see what I found out after a bit more investigation. Check out my Team National review.

Team National Review

The first think you obviously wanna know is what exactly is Team National? That’s what I wanted to know too. The name doesn’t really help much, does it?

So what exactly IS Team National?

Let’s have a look…

So Team National is what they call a “membership savings company”. They offer a range of discounts on regular retail purchases and from a range of different retailers.

To get these discounts, you gotta sign up.

And it ain’t cheap.

$795 for a 2-year membership.

Woah.

That’s a LOT more than most other discount clubs I’ve seen. You can get tons of different discounts these days for FREE.

But even for the discount schemes you DO have to pay for (like Coscto), we’re talking MUCH lower fees.

So that’s the first thing that jumps out about Team National.

I had a closer look at the actual specific retailers and discounts they were offering—and nothing was particularly groundbreaking. In my opinion.

But wait a minute. I know what you’re thinking.

What about Team National as a money-making opportunity? After all, that’s what you’re here for, right?

Okay, so the real way Team National affiliates make money out of this is by convincing OTHER people to sign up to the discount membership. Team National agents get a cut every time they get someone to sign up to the main offer.

That’s generally how Multi-Level Marketing networks like this work. They’ve taken a lot of flak in recent years. Some people still call them pyramid schemes, which MLM has become a byword for in some quarters.

Personally, I don’t think ALL MLM schemes are pyramid schemes. I don’t think they’re ALL scams. The way I look at is like this: is the actual product (in this case discount membership) ACTUALLY worth it? If it is, then there’s nothing wrong with people marketing it and taking a cut. The problem is, the Team National discount scheme looks a bit scammy. And it’s super-expensive for what you get. That’s where I think there’s a problem when you get highly-motivated (sometimes desperate) salespeople pushing worthless products ONLY for personal gain.

But what about Team National? Where do they fit in all this?

It’s not looking good so far, but we need a bit more detail.

These guys know their stuff.

I first heard about the Better Business Bureau a while back when I was researching another venture. They’ve normally got the low-down on things.

Let’s be real here, their BBB page isn’t that bad. I’ve seen a LOT worse. They’ve actually got a 5-Star A+ Rating.

There ARE quit a few complaints though. And they don’t look good.

I’ve seen some other Team National complaints elsewhere too. People complaining about not being able to even get any discounts, or simply being charged far too much for stuff that isn’t actually that much value.

One big negative for Team National here is that they only offer a THREE DAY refund policy. That’s hardly any time at all to really evaluate what you’ve just spent money on. What if you’d been working all week and didn’t have time to check until the weekend? It seems like a cut-and-run attempt.

There’s also some noise about pushy salespeople and a lot of hard-sell pitches.

That’s another problem with Team National. They use a few questionable tactics, and these create sales agents that are arguably forced to push pretty hard for the sale. Let’s have a look at them:

Sales agents have to make two sales a year in order to qualify for payouts. That’s already forcing them to make sales before they’ll even get any money. They’ve also gotta pay for things like a starter kit ($55) and more. This puts them out of pocket before things have even started. It looks like another way for Sales National to make even more money off the people who’re SUPPOSED to be helping them make money.

That first sale? You’re not gonna see any commission from it.

So how have the sales agents actually done? Not great.

The income figures aren’t too appetizing. Over 85% of Team National Agents aren’t making any money at all. Average earnings weren’t much more than $600.

What’s the most anyone made as a Team National agent? $5,435. That’s the top earner. Hardly a get-rich-quick scheme. Get poor slowly, more like.

One important thing to remember with Team National is that you don’t ACTUALLY have to buy the discount membership plan yourself in order to become an agent and sell it. That reduces costs a bit. But you might have a hard time selling the product if you don’t even have it yourself. Or maybe not.

So if you DID buy the plan before becoming an agent, the average earnings don’t even cover the cost of it. It looks like barely anyone is even making any money from Team National. Apart from Team National themselves, naturally.

There are other tiers to the sales agent system. Like a pyramid. You’ll get more money if you recruit your own set of sales agents. This is how those pyramid schemes work. It’s not just about getting people to sign up to the discount membership product. That’s the ACTUAL Team National product. It’s also about getting more AGENTS to sign up under you. And who keeps making money from this? Team National. You got it.

Save your money.

Team National Scam—Yes or No?

Okay, to answer this we gotta look at Team National on two levels. Is the discount membership a scam, and is the sales agent scheme a scam? I’m gonna answer both of these questions.

If you want discount stuff, there are much better places to go. Especially with the internet these days. There are plenty of places to get cool discounts for free. There are also discount clubs that are legit and charge WAY less than Team National.

However, it’s gonna be hard for me to outright say that the discount club is a complete scam. There are national retailers on there offering legit discounts. Nobody is running off with your money.

BUT. And that’s a big but…. It’s still a bit scammy. That price. The TWO year plan (WHY?!). And most of all… the refund policy. There’s no reason a legit business like this should be offering a THREE DAY cancellation policy on something that costs so much and is for a two-year membership. It simply doesn’t add up.

Now we come onto Team National as a money-making opportunity for sales agents. I’d say: Steer clear. It’s a bit scammy too.

You don’t get commission straight away. You have to keep making sales to make any money. You’ve gotta pay a fair whack to even be an agent and most of all: barely anyone is making any money with this. Are those enough reasons to NOT wanna join Team National as either a discount member OR a sales agent?! I think so.

Now I don’t wanna rat out the entire Multi-Level Marketing industry. It gets a bad rap already. Many people think ANY MLM scheme is automatically a pyramid scheme. Again, it the product is good at the base of the pyramid, I don’t see a problem with different levels of marketing and agents making money off of it. The problem REALLY starts when the actual thing people are selling is a load of crap, but people are still pushing it anyway.

So what’s my verdict? Steer clear of Team National. It is possible to make a bit of cash, but it’s not easy. You’ll also be promoting a product that simply isn’t that great.

So you’ve read this entire article looking for a money making opportunity, and I’ve told you to avoid one? What next? Easy. You need to try something where you really can make money, and that’s what I’ve been doing with my own Local Lead Generation business. It’s legit, and it’s making me good money for a while now. Check it out.

Check Out My 30 Day Success Formula Review to Find Out if It’s Really For You

Check Out My 30 Day Success Formula Review to Find Out if It’s Really For You

A few years back, I was broke– really broke that I couldn’t even afford to pay for my own groceries sometimes.

Up until the coming of the festive season, I knew things were going to get difficult, especially when I saw my nephew’s Christmas list.

“Wait… Lego costs HOW MUCH now?!”

I was gonna need to go the thrift store to buy gifts. But I knew I didn’t want to.

This was way before I started making legit money with Local Lead Generation. It was actually before I’d even got into internet marketing at all.

But I was desperate for ideas. I’d do anything for a bit of extra cash. Okay, not anything. But anything within reason. Let’s just say I had my hustle on.

So I was selling crap on eBay, picking up cans in the street for the recycle dime. You name it.

Wine bottle

This is how broke I was. 

I guess you could say it had got a bit easier to make money quickly like this thanks to the internet. A few years back, this sort of thing simply wouldn’t have been possible. Thankfully, I discovered eBay and it really helped.

I even tried those survey sites. I’m sure you’ve all encountered some of them too. It seemed like a great idea to start with until it turned out I’d be clicking my opinion on things for months before I even saw a check. Ok… Next!

Gambling offers were cool. You know those ones where they give you like $50 free to match your own deposit and you spam the blackjack tables with it?

However, there’s a couple of underlying problems there.

Firstly: I often didn’t have those $50 deposits.

Secondly: They were starting to get wise and stopping people using these offers for blackjack. Slots—don’t even think about it.

And oh yeah, thirdly: The authorities were starting to crack down on these places in my state. Finding sites to use was getting harder and harder. Bummer.

So I was running out of ideas.

That’s when I heard some of my bros cutting the crap at the bar one night. They were talking about something called the 30 Day Success Formula. My boy Kenny had actually made a few hundred bucks with it already. He was trying to push the idea to everyone else.

It was mid-November at this point, so a 30-day success plan sounded JUST RIGHT.

I had a closer look, and I’m going to share what I found in this 30 Day Success Formula Review.

30 Day Success Formula Review

I’ve got to be completely honest with you. I know you come to these reviews looking for legit advice from someone that’s actually used the program. I’ve written a few of these sorts of things before and I make sure I know enough about the product that I can always give people the heads up.

But let’s get things clear:

I didn’t sign up for 30 Day Success Formula.

There’s a reason for that—it looks a bit suspect.

When I first started digging about for info about the 30 Day Success Formula, I started sweating. You see, Kenny had already got a couple more of my boys involved. He was on my back about it every day.

pyramid scheme

So I was like, “Kenny, are you sure this isn’t a pyramid scheme?”

Kind of like this, but with envelopes instead of stones.

I’d seen a few of these scammy-type things before. They’re older than the internet itself, people have been getting into and losing money on pyramid schemes for decades. And this sure seemed like one.

Kenny was like “A pyra-what scheme?! Nah, bro! This is legit!”

But I wasn’t so sure. I’m going to base this review on what I found out from Kenny and my other boys, as well as what I dug up when I did my own research. Ultimately, I’ll tell you why I didn’t sign up for the 30 Day Success Formula. Then you can make your own choice.

Did you “Google 30 Day Success Formula Scam” and end up right here?

That’s one of the most common questions people have about 30 Day Success Formula.

Now I’m not saying that it IS a scam. There are loads of programs I’ve tried before that certainly seem that way and then turn out to be super legit in the end. So I wouldn’t wanna judge these guys too soon. But let’s have a look at what I found when I did some digging.

Why didn’t I sign up to 30 Day Success Formula?

Let’s start with the basics. I banged 30 Day Success Formula into Google and the first autocomplete suggestion was “30 Day Success Formula BBB”. That’s the number one thing people were searching for relating to this program and it’s what Google thought I wanted to see the most.

I didn’t, but it got me curious. So I went through with the search. I didn’t really know what BBB was at that point, but it rang a bit of a bell.

Oh yeah… It was the Better Business Bureau. These guys basically rate different businesses and give you a trust score, as well as listing what sort of complaints people have been making.

Sounds good, right? Well… It wasn’t starting to sound too good for our guys at 30 Day Success Formula.

BBB Rating Logo

30 Day Success Formula BBBWhat was their overall BBB Rating? A big fat F.

Ouch!

I haven’t seen a grade that bad since I last took algebra in high school.

There’s also a whole host of complaints there. All sorts of stuff. I dug a bit deeper. People hadn’t been getting what they’d paid for. There were some lengthy complaints and lots of them. This wasn’t looking great. I was supposed to be giving these guys money? I don’t think so.

There were also questions over their use of the BBB logo, and where they say they’re located not actually their exact location. Hmmm… Did Kenny know all this?

But wait a minute. I stopped for a second and started thinking. All sorts of businesses get complaints all the time. I’m sure every company has a list of negative stuff on a site like this, right?

So I put Coca Cola into the BBB search engine. Surely a huge company like that will have pissed off a few people along the way. Right?

Coca Cola: A+ Rating. Zero complaints.

30 Day Success Formula had 150 complaints in the last year.

I also started reading the actual reviews for 30 Day Success Formula and cringed even harder. There were loads of people who paid their money and didn’t see anything back. They couldn’t even get a refund, either.

That’s when Kenny called me up and told me he’d just got even more money from the 30 Day Success Formula. He was getting ready to buy a new pickup truck. Was this guy legit, or was he in on it too? I’d known Kenny for years, but something didn’t seem right.

How does the 30 Day Success Formula work, anyway?

If it looks like a pyramid scheme and sounds like a pyramid scheme—it’s a pyramid scheme.

I’ve gotta show you how 30 Day Success Formula works in a bit more detail. Then you’ll have all the info you need to see if it’s for you or not.

And let’s be clear here: you can still make money with it. Kenny did, and after some more digging I found out that he’d just got in at the right time. The guys at the top– the first people into the system– can make money. It’s the guys a bit further down that struggle. The guys Kenny had got signed up? They aren’t doing so well.

Most of the other reviews for this system on other sites you can find are pretty positive.

That’s because they’re trying to sell you something.

They get a cut when someone signs up to 30 Day Success Formula. It’s as simple as that.

I don’t, so I can give you a legit review without any ulterior motive.

30 day success formula scam

There’s another really fishy thing about the 30 Day Success Formula: It’s a cash business. That’s right—there’s no paper trail here. You can’t buy with a credit card or anything like that. The main business model involves sending envelopes stuffed with cash around the place.

Is this legit?

Really?

Yes, really.

If that isn’t enough to put you off, let’s have a look at how you actually make money with the 30 Day Success Formula.

There are 6 levels to this program and you start at the bottom by “investing” $250. This can sometimes be found at a discounted price of $89.

The next step? Sending letters. No, not emails. Actual letters.

So when you start at the first level you send out 3 letters to physical addresses. All you’re trying to do is get them to sign up too. As you move up a level, the money to join is higher, but the money you supposedly get back is higher too.

Level Costs

So one of the levels costs a hefty $5,000 to get to, but you’ll get back $2,000 from everyone the level below you who you convince to sign up.

But what are they actually signing up to?

That’s the problem with the 30 Day Success Formula. You’re basically getting people to jump on a chain of hoping to get money by convincing more people to sign up for the same scheme. There isn’t actually any value to the scheme in itself. It’s just a pyramid scheme. That’s how they work.

I thought they were banned nowadays too, but it seems not.

So at level 1, you pay $89 to join and then get $20 back from everyone who signs up from your letter.

You can send out more letters if you want, to increase your chance of signups—only you have to PAY to send out more letters.

Kenny must have really got lucky because I talked to some of my other buddies who got in a bit later than him. One guy paid $250 to start with and sent out his 3 letters. What did he get back? Nada. Nothing.

That’s the problem with this sort of thing. Most people aren’t going to sign up for it. I know quite a lot about marketing these days, and let me tell you—only sending out 3 letters isn’t going to lead to much success. Especially for an offer like this. That would require an extremely high conversion rate to even make sense.

Or you can pay $299 for 200 more emails. They say you’ll get about 4% in signups. I don’t know how legit this is, but if it is—you could actually make some money.

But don’t forget—the people at the bottom will only make money if they convince more people to sign up. It’s even harder for them.

I also found this site that was talking about cash gifting schemes and how people are using them to avoid paying tax. I enjoy paying tax about as much as you do, but I also don’t wanna get in trouble doing something that’s so obviously avoiding it.

I might catch a bit of flack for just straight out calling 30 Day Success Formula a pyramid scheme. I’m not an expert on them, and maybe there’s a slight difference. Maybe that’s why this scheme isn’t banned.

But there isn’t an actual product or anything of value you’re buying with the money you send. You’re just sending people money, moving up levels and feeding a never-ending circle. That sounds like a pyramid scheme to me, but what do I know?

If you’re desperate for cash, you might still want to give this a go. There is money to be made. Kenny managed it. But a few of my other bros didn’t. Be careful.

Me? I was still desperate for cash. I guess it helped that this thing actually cost money to sign-up for the money I didn’t have. I might have made the wrong decision if I’d had that first $89 spare. Or maybe it would have been the right one? I guess we’ll never know.

In the end, I had to take some shifts at a local bar to get the money I needed. It sucked not being able to get rich quick online, but I guess sometimes you do actually have to make sensible decisions. I made some good tips, too—so it wasn’t all bad.

It wasn’t for a couple more years until I really started making money in internet marketing. I guess some of the stuff I learned about the 30 Day Success Formula helped me later on. If you really want to make actual legit money online and take a nice slice of digital property, you should check out Local Lead Generation. I’ve been pulling in some big commission recently doing just that.

Kenny's new truck.

Kenny’s new truck.

As for Kenny, he got his new truck. I think he moved onto something else when money starts drying up with the 30 Day Success Formula. Some of the other guys didn’t even get a truck out of it. But I’ve actually started helping them with Local Lead Generation too and they were stoked to find out that you can actually make money online.