Is World Ventures Right for You? Check Out This Handy Review

Is World Ventures Right for You? Check Out This Handy Review

Back in high school, there was this dude in my class called Ron. 

Now Ron was BIG into ancient Egypt. He loved that stuff. 

That’s cool, everyone’s gotta have a passion. 

Bruce was into Space, bigtime. 

Me? I was into baseball. 

The teachers were probably a bit happier with kids wanting to be archaeologists or physicists than some pie-in-the-sky baseball dream. But I didn’t care. 

Ron’s camel. 

Maybe there were right, though. Bruce went on to work for NASA. Nice. 

And Ron? Well things were a bit different with Ron. 

I hadn’t heard from him for a good few years. 

This one night me and the boys were cutting the crap in the local bar. 

Just a few drinks after a hard week, you know how it goes. 

Then imagine my surprise when someone piped up with some new info on our old boy Ron. 

No, he wasn’t leading expeditions into ancient Egypt. 

But he WAS doing something to do with pyramids. 

He was working for a PYRAMID SCHEME! 

HAHA! 

One of my other bros was laughing about how ironic that was, since he was so into ancient Egypt. I’m not sure it was irony, but then English wasn’t my passion either. It sure was funny though. 

Bruce chilling. 

Since I’d been working in internet marketing for a while now, I’d seen a lot of these come and go. 

You see, I’d been making some good bank for a few years with Local Lead Generation. It’s as legit as they come. More on that later. 

But the thing is, before I found Local Lead Generation, I’d tried a lot of duds. 

 
Things you THINK are gonna take off, but never do. 

So I’d seen a lot of these pyramid schemes. I’d seen a lot of people fail on them, too. 

I was always kinda apprehensive about getting into them. 

I’d seen how they sometimes preyed on desperate people. But I’d also seen people make good money from them. 

So I wanted to know more about this scheme. It was called World Ventures. Nope, never heard of it either. It sure sounded pretty generic. 

 
But I’d always been the kinda guy who didn’t like to rush to judgements. 

Ron was one of the smartest guys in our class. He was also a decent bloke. 

 
And apparently, he’d been making real bank with this. 

We’re talking yacht money. Nice. 

Living the dream! 

So I decided to have a closer look into World Ventures. I was gonna start at the bottom without any prejudices. See if it works for normal people who DIDN’T get into it early like Ron did. 

You see, I didn’t mind some of the marketing networks. They tend to call them MLM or MultiLevel Marketing. It’s all good if the products are quality and the people at the bottom (the late adopters) can still make money. 

Was that the case with World Ventures? Read my World Ventures review to find out. 

World Ventures Review 

At the start, I thought it’d be a good idea to give Ron a heads up. I thought I could ask him a few questions and make sure he knew I was gonna be writing this review. 

Trouble is, I was having a hard time getting hold of him. 

I mean, we weren’t that close back in the day, but I still thought he’d talk to me. 

I reached out to some of his closer friends. No luck. 

I was starting to think he didn’t really want to talk about World Ventures. 

I wondered why, but tried not to make any judgements. 

It was no biggie, I mean maybe it’d be better if I just got into World Ventures without any prior knowledge. Like the real people who were just starting on this. 

But wait a minute. I’m getting WAY ahead of myself here. We haven’t even covered the basics. What even IS World Ventures? 

Let’s have a look… 

World Ventures touts itself as a dream vacation provider. That’s all good, I can dig it. 

 
Only instead of actually selling these vacations yourself, it turns out the main way to make money is by recruiting other salespeople. That’s kinda how most pyramid schemes work these days. Sorry. Most MLM networks, I meant. Ha! 

Anyway, they’re not all bad. I wanted to know if World Ventures was one of the good ones. After all, Ron had been making big bucks, right? 

World Ventures was founded in 2005, and it brought in nearly a billion in revenue in 2016. Nice. 

They SAY they’ve got 500,000 employees—but this figure’s unconfirmed. I reckon they’re simply adding up the number of network salespeople that occasionally work for them. Maybe that have EVER worked for them. But again, this is unconfirmed as well. It’s just a hunch. I’m 100% on hunches half of the time. 

So World Ventures was started by this dude Wayne Nugent, along with his buddy Mike Azcue. They SAY that they wanted to build the “Mary Kay of travel”—I found that blurb when I was Googling them. Trouble is, I don’t know who Mary Kay is. I guess that’s for another article. What I THINK they’re saying is that they wanna be successful. I get that. Don’t we all? 

Anyway, things certainly got off to a good start for Wayne and Mike. Ernst and Young even nominated our boy Wayne to be entrepreneur of the year in 2010. So these aren’t the sort of scam artists you see running other networks. They’ve got traction and a reasonably amount of respect in industry circles. 

But does that mean it’s a good idea signing up to be a World Ventures rep? I’m not sure. 

Yes, the guys at the top are raking it in. Big respect to them for that. But what about guys like me who were just gonna start at the bottom and hopefully make some money? What about guys like you? 

I’m sure that’s why you’re at this World Ventures review. After all, it’s too late to be one of the lucky ones who got in at the start. Guys like Ron. What happened to Ron, anyway? More on Ron later. 

It hasn’t been completely plain-sailing for Mike and Wayne, either. They’ve made a ton of cash—but they’ve also been sued continuously. Even by the Norwegian Government. 

These guys weren’t fans. 

What were they sued for? Being a pyramid scheme, basically. Told you. 

Should have known, since Ron was always into those Egyptians. 

What does World Ventures Even sell? 

We’ve got this far into the review and you still don’t really know what World Ventures are trying to pimp. It’s about travel, we get that, but what’s so special about it? 

In a word… Nothing. 

I mean, they’re offering discounts and other travel-based offers for a monthly fee. A lot of this stuff can be found on other big-name affiliate sites WITHOUT the monthly fee. You’re basically paying for discounts. Some of them are ok, but I wouldn’t say they’re REALLY worth singing up to a monthly plan for. 

Look, it’s not scammy at this level. You won’t see me calling this a World Ventures scam. You pay your monthly fee, and you get some good discounts. 

Some people might prefer to do this than spend hours finding these discounts individually. Time is money, right? 

But when I looked a bit deeper into these offers they seemed even less attractive. They weren’t flexible at all with dates or anything like that. Basically, if you like an offer, you have to book it on their terms and the ability to customize things isn’t easy. 

You can’t combine offers either, or save reward points to spend all at once. Things are pretty limited here. There are much better travel offer sites out there. Many of these you don’t have to pay for. 

This is always one of my biggest problems with pyramid schemes like this. Sorry, MLM Networks. Keep making that mistake. 

Basically, if the products are good, then what’s the problem? I don’t see one with using a network to promote stuff. 

But when they products AREN’T good, that’s when I start to have second thoughts. 

But the REAL problem with MLM networks like this is even bigger… 

It’s that they’re really hard to make money with for people at the bottom of the pyramid. 

So if the people buying these plans aren’t getting anything good, and the people selling them aren’t making any money. What’s the point? Answers on a postcard, please. 

Oh yeah. I know what the point was—the people at the stop still continue to make money. Just nobody else gets any value at all from this stuff. 

THAT’S why MLM networks are getting a bad rap these days. 

So in order to become an affiliate with World Ventures, you gotta pay a signup fee and then a monthly fee. Most affiliate networks I’ve worked with are happy to let you in for free in return for promoting their products. 

 
Problem is, because the products aren’t that great or easy to promote—the main way it seems like World Ventures makes any money is with these membership plans. Yep, you got it—they make the bulk of their cash from their affiliates, rather than their actual products. 

 
And when you realise that you’ve gotta pay for an even more costly affiliate membership in order to qualify for the best commissions, things get even harder. 

 
I remember when i first got into affiliate marketing, I was stoked with how much content and help PROPER affiliates gave me. And when I started making sales, I started making money. I DID NOT have to pay them before I started making sales. And I qualified for higher commissions based on my performance, NOT how much I paid them. Spotting the difference here? That’s not how World Ventures works… 

And while people are still making money from World Ventures (people like Ron)—there’s an income disclosure statement which makes for interesting reading. 

 
Basically, it says that 80% of affiliates aren’t making any money from World Ventures. And that 99% of affiliates make less than $2,000 a year. For those of you thinking about quitting their day jobs for this—think again. For those who’ve ALREADY quit their day jobs for this—Ouch. 

So nobody’s really making money from this anymore? Not the people at the bottom, anyway. And there are loads of legal issues associated with World Ventures? And the products people end up with aren’t that great? I think you know which way to go on this already. 

And back to the product range. The problem with using this model to promote World Ventures is that you often get desperate salespeople who’re already out of pocket pushing low-quality products to people who don’t really want them. The hard sell. You got it. This leaves both parties unhappy. And that’s not a party I wanna be involved in. No cake, either. 

So what happened to Ron? Ah yeah, our boy Ron. 

 
He still wasn’t answering my calls. Ron, bro! We go way back. 

I’d heard on the grapevine that he’d been taking a lot of heat from friends and family that he’d got involved in World Ventures. He’d made some nice cash, and bought some cool stuff. But things were drying up. Word was that he’d moved on to some more legit money-making ventures. Good for him. 

But where does that leave the people further down the pyramid? I want my $200 signup fee back! 

A bit later, I started finding some better ways to make money online. 

 
What I realised was that these get rich quick schemes were often just that. Schemes. 

To make actual money, you’ve normally gotta put a bit of work in. I know that doesn’t sound like fun to most of you. But that’s just the way it is. 

 
I found this other cool gig called Local Lead Generation. It lets you set up your own lead generation business for real clients who pay well. It could be your first step towards that passive income deal you’ve always wanted. It was for me, anyway. You should check it out.  

Primerica Review

When I was young, I always wanted to be the next big baseball start 

Haha. I know you’ve all had dreams like that. 

 
Trouble is, I wasn’t actually that good at baseball. Ouch. 

Yeah I used to play every day in the summer with my pals. We had a great time. Sometimes, the dream is better than actually getting there. 

You see, I wanted to be a baseball star because I LOVED the sport. I dreamed of hitting that winning homer in the World Series one day. 

Living the dream. 

My pal Buck was different. 

 
Man, this guy had talent. 

You should have seen his right arm. I would have killed for it. Maybe. 

The problem with Buck was that while he had all the talent you could ask for, he had none of the desire. 

Yeah, he wanted the fast cars and fast women—but he never really wanted to put the work in. 

So after a few failed attempts at trials for big colleges, he ended up with a Division 2 NCAA team. At college, he partied all the time. 

 
I didn’t blame him, not one bit. 

But he was throwing this talent away, bigtime. 

What’s Buck doing these days? He’s selling used cars. There’s nothing wrong with that, but he could have lived the dream. That car lot could have been his own. 

For me, things went a bit different. I didn’t have that natural talent, but I did have a good work ethic. 

I was always hustling. 

 
By the time Buck was realizing he was about to get cut from his Minor League team, I’d already bought my first investment condo. 

You see, I’d got into internet marketing just at the right time. I’d had some good success, but I’d also had some major failures. 

 
Boy, if only I could tell you about all those failures. We haven’t got all day. 

There were some big successes too. Like Local Lead Generation which I’m into BIGTIME right now. It’s as legit as they come. More on that in a bit. 

Anyway, let’s just say I’d seen a lot of shoddy operators in my time. In fact, I’d kinda become the local authority on any of this stuff with all my Buddies. 

Now we get back to Buck. 

You see, Buck hadn’t been making enough to support his family at the car lot. Times were hard. He’d recently been convinced by his brother to get involved with something called Primerica. 

I was like, “Oh… okay. Are you sure?” 

But he was all in. 

If only he’d had this sort of motivation back in the day when the baseball scouts were calling. All he wanted to do then was play on his SNES or smoke weed. Idiot. 

Anyway, I’d seen a few of these sort of scams before in my time. Is this a Primerica Scam? You need to check out my Primerica review to find out. I had a closer look. Perhaps that means you don’t have to now. 

Primerica Review 

What even IS Primercia? 

Insurance sales. That’s what Buck said anyway. 

 
Okay, got it. 

Wait, no I haven’t,. 

You’re gonna become an insurance salesperson?! 

I guess you DO know how to sell cars. Sometimes. 

Firstly, Primerica is known as part of the MLM world. 

 
What IS MLM, I hear you ask? 

 
Multi Level Marketing. 

Okay, you’re still non the wiser, right? 

That was me when someone first fired those letters at my brain. 

Don’t worry, I got you. 

MLM is basically like a pyramid scheme. SOMETIMES. 

They’re not all bad. There are actually some legit ones out there. 

It’s where you market products on a different level and get promoted to a higher network in order to get better commission. 

Some of these CAN be a bit fishy, but I’m alright with them if the products at the bottom of the pyramid are actually of any value. Sometimes they are, sometimes they’re not. 

In my opinion, that’s what makes an MLM scheme either GOOD or BAD. The PRODUCTS. 

Only Primerica was a bit different here, so it took me a while to get my head around it. They weren’t selling ACTUAL products like some of these other “schemes”. They were selling…. insurance. 

Okay. Insurance. Great. 

 
Everyone needs that, right? 

 
I get can involved with that. 

So I had all sorts of questions lined up for Buck. What kind of insurance? How good was it? How much can we make? How easy is it to sell? HOW are we actually supposed to sell it? 

Trouble is, I didn’t really know the first thing about being an insurance salesman. Neither did Buck. DESPITE already being a salesman. 

You’re losing faith in Buck here, aren’t you? 

I was too. 

So over the next few weeks I dived into Primerica so I could find out what the deal was. Hopefully, I was gonna find answers to all those questions and more. 

Did I? 

Let’s have a look… 

The first hurdle was that actually RESEARCHING Primerica was pretty hard. These guys, like Amway, have been around for decades. You’ve probably already heard of them at some point. 

They rang a bell in the back of my head but I wasn’t sure where from. 

For something that’s been around for so long and SUPPOSEDLY helped so many people make money, it was super-hard to actually find anything out on them. 

Seems fishy, right? I always liked a bit of fish, especially cod or haddock. But NOT when I’m trying to see if a company is legit online or not. 

Very fishy. 

The thing is, when you search for something like “Primerica review” or “Primerica scam”, you actually get a load of marketing spam from people trying to PROMOTE Primerica. 
 
You probably saw this when you made those searches yourself. 

Finding valuable info like on this here site isn’t always easy. Especially when more than half the other Google options are people actually trying to sell you Primerica. I’ve developed a bit of sense for separating bullshit reviews from those offering real value, but not everyone is like me. 

That’s why you need this review. 

So I attended a couple of Primerica promotional events to get a grip of things,. 

That’s when things actually started looking up. For a bit. 

 
Primerica wasn’t like a lot of those other MLM schemes I’d seen. 

There are a ton of Primerica agents and their job was to try and get me to join up. Fair enough so far, I thought. 

Primerica was gonna train me to become a financial adviser. This isn’t something you can really be good at if you aren’t a good financial planner. Things weren’t looking good for Buck at this point. Sorry Buck. 

Anyway, I liked my chances. And what differentiated Primerica from a lot of those other pyramiddy things is that I’d have to train and pass an exam before I was allowed to offer financial advice. 

While that barrier to entry was sure to put a number of people off, it also put me at ease slightly. This wasn’t one of those deals where they simply invited anyone who could pay onboard. Or did they? 

Then things sadly started returning to form. This structure started looking a bit more like a pyramid than I’d first hoped. 

 
I was disappointed, but I can’t say I was surprised. 

The hard sell was in full-swing at this point. And oh yeah, I was highly encouraged to “protect” myself with their insurance plan before anything really got started. 

There’s a lot of hype around all these products and I didn’t really understand why I needed them. Buck definitely didn’t understand either. Poor Buck. 

Remember when I said a scheme lives and dies by the quality of their products? Well now I knew a bit more about what Primerica were offering, I could make a slightly better judgement. 

Or, I thought I could. 

 
Trouble was, this stuff was confusing. Even for me. And I consider myself pretty clever with financial stuff like this. Buck didn’t stand a chance. 

As I said, there were a lot of products, there was a lot of hype, and there was a big hard-sell. 

I also saw an internal document that was encouraging people to start selling BEFORE they’d actually qualified as state-licensed financial advisors. That was even more fishy. After all, that’s why I first started liking Primerica as an idea. I was gonna become state-qualified, right? 

Only they wanted me to start selling and “advising” way before that. I was gonna tell people that I was currently studying to become licensed, and that was enough? 

How many people actually ended up getting licensed? I didn’t know the answer. Can’t help you. 

There’s also loads of training on some pretty hard-sell type stuff. 

I hated these sorts of gigs. If something was good enough, it shouldn’t need a hard sell. 

The products should ALWAYS speak for themselves. 

Despite being a used car salesman, Buck didn’t really like the hard sell either. Buck has a lot of faults, but he’s a cool guy. He was always one of those relaxed salesmen who let people decide for themselves on the most part. This wasn’t for him, either. 

In fact, Buck was pretty confused at this point. I don’t blame him. I was too. How were we actually gonna make money from this stuff? 

I had yet to see anyone who had. I still haven’t. 

Another one of those. 

You’ve probably already guessed the best way to make money from Primerica. That’s right, recruiting more “advisors” under you. THAT’S always the kicker with pyramid schemes like this. 

Primerica doesn’t even deny being a pyramid scheme in their internal literature. Someone leaked that and I managed to see a bit of it. 

Actually, you couldn’t really officially start selling some of the products until you were licensed, but you COULD recruit more people under you to make commission that way. Especially as each trainee advisor was highly encouraged to buy some insurance for themselves at the start. 

Don’t worry, I didn’t fall for that. 

Look, Primerica isn’t a complete scam. It’s not awful. The products at the bottom aren’t COMPLETELY useless. They’ve got a range of financial instruments, and some of them could be for you. If I’m honest, I was still a bit confused at this point so I didn’t really know if they WERE any good or not. 

Their main product is called “Term Life” insurance. 

I did a bit more digging on this. 

 
Term life insurance is like life insurance but just for a specified term. Sounds simple, right? So you could be covered for ten or twenty years rather than for the rest of your life. 

Problem is, Primerica’s term life insurance is actually quite a lot more expensive than some of the competitors in that industry. 

But hey, That’s not TOO bad, right? 

I mean, I’ve seen some pyramid scams in the past where the basic products at the bottom of the pyramid are completely WORHTLESS. 

At least this was legit insurance. It was just a bit more expensive. 

Another thing: you probably won’t qualify for Primerica if you’re in a high risk group. Okay, fine. It’s still viable for plenty of people, 

What I’m trying to get at here is that there ARE better insurance firms out there. Cheaper ones. Ones who’re more likely to insure you. 

HOWEVER…. Primerica is far from the worst deal out there. 

Normally, at this point in my reviews I’m at that NO NO NO stage. We aren’t really there with Primerica. Does that mean I’m ACTUALLY recommending them? 

Well, I wouldn’t got that far. 

But there are a lot worse out there, believe me. 

The thing is, there are also a lot better. 

Like Local Lead Generation. I’ve been getting more and more involved in that recently. It’s super easy, and a great way to make some real bank. Even Buck could do it. That means you could too. 

Check Out This ACN Review to Find Out If It Can Really Make Money For You

I jumped into ACN so you don’t have to… 

I remember a few years back, when my buddies were on a big health drive to try and get back in shape. There’s nothing wrong with that.So when I first started hearing them talk about ACN, I thought it was part of that.”Hey bro, you tried ACN yet?””Yeah man, I couldn’t stomach the taste. Too sharp for me.””Wait…. What?” 

No… Not that. 

I thought they were talking about Apple Cider Vinegar. Ha! I know there was a lot of hype in the health and supplement world about that.”Haha! Bro! Not Apple Cider Vinegar, ACN! The telecoms company!”Oh… Right. No, I hadn’t tried ACN yet. But the amount they’d been talking about it, I thought I needed to give it a try. After all, my boy Bud had just bought a new motorboat thanks to ACN. Months before, he could barely afford to pay rent, so that got my interest for sure.Over the next few weeks, I dived into ACN. It was quite a journey. In this ACN review, I’m gonna tell you my story about how it all went. Then you can decide if ACN is really for you or not. I might be bias, but I think this is one of the best ACN reviews around. 

Bud’s boat. 

And remember, this was a while before I found a real legit way to make money online—and that was with Local Lead Generation. I’ll tell you more about that in a bit. But first, you wanna know about ACN…ACN ReviewOkay. We’ve got this far and you still don’t really know what ACN is, right? That was me, too.ACN stands for American Communications Network. This was much harder to find out than it should have been. Oh, and they aren’t just American, either. There’s an ACN Europe Division. Actually, my research into ACN threw up quite a few people in the UK as well as the States promoting ACN.They’re a telecom company. Ok. Got it. They sell phones, landlines, video-call software. Stuff like that. When I found this out, it was something I could get behind. I knew I’d be trying to sell their products, and I’d already done a bit of affiliate marketing myself so I knew how important knowing about your niche is when trying to promote stuff like that. I used phones, right? I was sure I could sell them.Only the more I learned about ACN, I soon realized that this wasn’t standard affiliate marketing. It started smelling a bit more fishy. And I started to doubt these “products” I was selling.The first rule of sales is to believe in your product. 

I made that up, but I think it makes sense. 

And if you can’t believe in your product, you’re gonna have a hard time selling it. I soon starting doubting both my products AND the way I was expected to sell them with ACN, and that’s not great. But we’re jumping ahead. Let’s start at the beginning. 

And oh yeah. I STILL don’t know what ACN actually stands for. Your guess is as good as mine. This sort of info simply isn’t that easy to find. It should be, shouldn’t it?When I first enquired about ACN I was introduced to this guy who was gonna be my “upline mentor”, Colin. I didn’t really know what this meant. I was expecting someone who was actually employed in an official position at ACN, but this guy just seemed like someone who’d got involved with the system a bit earlier than me. He actually told me that he’d tried a few other MLM schemes before settling on ACN.This set a few alarm bells off in my head. 

I hadn’t heard much about ACN by this point, but I HAD heard about MLM. I thought that meant a pyramid scheme. So I asked Colin about it. His answer was a bit vague. Was ACN a pyramid scheme? 

I soon did a bit more research myself and found out that not ALL MLM schemes are as bad as those pyramid schemes that you see in the news. MLM stands for Multilevel Marketing and it CAN be a legit way to promote things. But wasn’t always. Was it gonna be legit with ACN? I was soon gonna find out.So first I had to go to this meeting. I was suspicious, but willing to give it a go. 

There was a wide range of people there, some of them were pretty cool. 

But here’s one other thing… Some of them had been told some pretty wild tales to get them there. One guy thought he was just showing up to look at some luxury cars, and now they had him sitting down listening to a sales pitch. He wasn’t happy.Anyway, at this meeting—we all learned a bit more about ACN. But only a little bit.There was a bit of a hard-sell to sign up straight away. We were told it was a limited offer. So i jumped in.A few weeks later, I heard they were doing the same “limited offer” to a bunch of other people. Seems like that’s just a tactic. They do it every month. Not good.Anyway, back to the meeting. We’d be selling a range of telecoms products. But in order to “qualify” to sell them, we had to buy them first. 

More alarm bells.What?No affiliate marketing network I’d ever signed up to made me actually buy the product before I promoted it.But I thought I’d give it a go anyway as the video-phone looked pretty cool. I signed up to a $40 plan. Not cheap, but I thought I’d be rolling in more sales soon enough. 

I was wrong.And oh yeah… the phone didn’t really work. I tried getting them to fix it, but to no avail. I was stuck paying $40 a month for a product I didn’t really want. One that didn’t really work properly either. I was starting to feel a bit less happy about trying to promote this product, too.Remember that rule I made up? Believe in your product. I didn’t believe in this.So the first people I was gonna sell it to were friends and other people I knew well. As soon as my phone broke, I realized I didn’t wanna promote it to people that already trusted me. This isn’t a great business model, is it? I didn’t feel THAT happy about promoting it to people I didn’t know, either.Kinda like this  

Then we got to what ACN was REALLY about. Recruiting more salespeople. I told Colin I thought this was a marketing deal where I was gonna promote the product.That’s when he broke the news. The real way to make money is to recruit more salespeople. 

Oh… you mean like a pyramid scheme?I soon started wondering if ACN was just a network of affiliates, or sales reps. Colin had recruited me, and got a cut from my signup fee. I was gonna get a cut for anyone I recruited. They’d each be buying a phone to “qualify” and then probably not selling any more. The only way to sell the phones was to convince more sales reps to sign up.The biggest problem I had with this was the quality of the product. And what happens to the people at the bottom of the pyramid who didn’t manage to sign anyone up? 

At the moment, that person at the bottom of the pyramid was me.And then I remembered some of the people at the first meeting about ACN. Some of these guys were pretty desperate for money. I didn’t like the idea of convincing more people to be a part of this thing. 

Especially when they told me the best place to start was with my close circle of friends. There was no way I was gonna be involved with getting these guys into a pyramid scheme. 

Yeah, I know a few of my buddies were going on about ACN before. But that was just a select group of guys who’re always involved in some scheme or another. I wasn’t about to promote this to my OTHER pals.They wanted me to set up my own meeting. Like the one I went to. They even suggested I made up a bullshit reason for the meeting OTHER than ACN—to get people to turn up.At this point, I was out.But I still wanted to know more about ACN. I wanted to know how my buddy bought a boat. I wanted to know if I’d jumped off that boat too soon.So I did some more research. I actually went to one of the meetings that was arranged by a guy I met at my first meeting. Just to see how it went.It didn’t go great. Half the people there thought they were coming to a pool party.They weren’t happy when it turned into a sales pitch. Most of them left. The guy who set the party up didn’t seem happy either.That’s why I recommended he got some real affiliate marketing training from one of a number of different legit online courses. There are real ways to make money and be your own boss, but ACN doesn’t seem like one of them. He just needed pointing in the right direction. He needed to look for some real internet marketing training. A few months later, I’d heard he’d done just that. He was much happier now.The ACN ScamIf you got here, you’re probably wondering if ACN is a scam or not, right?Look. It’s not great. I don’t like calling ANYTHING a scam, especially as I ducked out super-early. But it’s not a cool deal for anyone. It’s not a cool deal for the people buying the phones, or the people trying to promote them.My opinion on MLM schemes like this is that as long as the product is good, there’s nothing wrong with a few people up and down the line making money promoting it via a network. But if you’re trying to trick people into buying a piece of crap, and the only way to really make money is by increasing the size of the sales-rep network, then it’s not great. That’s really just a pyramid scheme. I went to a few more of these “meetings”. Sometimes there were guys there who’d done a bit better out of ACN. One of them turned up in a real flash car. When the meeting didn’t go well and most people left (like always), this guy told us not to invite anymore broke people. Nice. Not.I wasn’t a fan of the hard sell, and I wasn’t a fan of their “product range”, either. Or their marketing practices. I’m not gonna tell you that you can’t make money with ACN. You can. But if you ask me whether there are better ways—then yes, there are. If you’re using predatory practices to sell stuff that doesn’t have much value to people who don’t need it—then there are definitely better ways. 

It’s not a scam in the “they’re gonna run off with all my money” kinda way. They DO have products. But as a money-making idea, it’s not great. And it won’t leave you feeling too happy. Or with too much money. 

But what about guys like Bud? Bud had got lucky. He got in at just the right time. He was at the top of the pyramid. Guys like me and the other people I met didn’t have it so good. 

But get this, even Bud stopped with ACN a few months later. Even he’d realized that it wasn’t as great as he first thought. 

At least he got a boat out of it. 

This all happened a while before I’d found a real way to make actual money online with Local Lead Generation. This idea was legit, and it was a way to own a slice of virtual real estate, where I could start collecting monthly rental checks quickly and easily. You should check out Local Lead Generation too. 

Check Out This Global Affiliate Zone Review To See If You Can Make Money From It

Heard about some kind of Global Affiliate Zone scam? I’m gonna drop the info you’ve been looking for 

I’ve been making money online for a good few years now. But it hasn’t always been that easy. 

Actually, right now I’m making real bank with my own Local Lead Generation venture. It’s legit, and I’m gonna tell you more about it in a bit. 

But first, I need to drop some info on this OTHER online venture. It’s called Global Affiliate Zone. I like to call it GAZ. But not when my buddy Gaz is around, that gets confusing. 

That’s Gaz, not Global Affiliate Zone. 

Anyway, a few years back I realized that I had some titanic-sized gaps in my internet marketing knowledge. I knew SOME stuff really well, but I was still missing the basics elsewhere. 

I wanted to know more. 

I was kinda a bit jealous of my buddy Ken who’d recently got back from Antigua. Not only that, but he’d also just bought a Lambo. 

What is it with internet marketers and Lamborghinis? Where’s the Ferrari love? Anyway, at that point, I’d be happy with either. 

Ken had his finger in about fifteen different pies. The thing is, he knew so much about internet marketing I didn’t know where to start. 

I needed to know more. 

Ken was away for a bit so he wasn’t on hand to fill me in on where to get the education he had. He was in the Pacific this time, was hard to reach even online. 

But I didn’t think this’d be a problem. You see, there were SO MANY different online training courses out there—I knew that finding a bit more info shouldn’t be too hard. 

But where was I gonna start? It’s like when you go for Pizza and there are too many choices. No, not the pineapple one. Eww. 

If there were only two pizzas on the menu, I’d be able to choose easily. Just not the pineapple one, right? 

Too many pizzas! 

And that’s the thing with internet marketing courses. There are SO MANY of them. Some of them sure do look a lot like scams, but I know there’s some valuable info in there somewhere, surely? 

Trouble was, Ken was out of reach. My other buddies were more interested in getting yucky and passing out each night. Or staying in and playing Call of Duty. They didn’t know the first thing about internet marketing. Even less than me. 

That’s when I heard of Global Affiliate Zone. It looked pretty good. I thought I might need to give it a go. 

One of the cool things about Global Affiliate Zone was that it wasn’t as much to join. Some of those other plans cost thousands, and I wasn’t about to drop that much money right away. 

However, I soon learned that things weren’t what they seemed with our friend GAZ. It was NOT what I was expecting. 

So keep reading my Global Affiliate Zone review to see what went wrong. I’m dropping this info for you so you don’t have to make the same mistakes I did. 

Global Affiliate Zone Review 

Okay, so what I THOUGHT I was getting with Global Affiliate Zone was an online marketing education. It’s marketed A LOT like a course. Something where I could learn general info and set up my own independent venture. 

Slowly, I started to realize that this wasn’t exactly how Global Affiliate Zone worked. 

I started to see some stones. 

Stones? 

Stones. 

Like the Rolling Stones? Stoners? 

No. 

Stones like you get in a pyramid. 

A pyramid scheme. 

More on that in a minute. 

First, let’s start at the beginning. 

A bit like that. 

What is Global Affiliate Zone? 

Global Affiliate Zone is a network marketing company. Nope, I didn’t really know what that meant at the time either. But I do now, and it’s not great. 

Here’s what they say about themselves: 

“Global Affiliate Zone is dedicated to providing the most comprehensive coaching and resources regarding online marketing strategies.” 

Okay, great. That sounds a lot like a coaching course. It sounds a lot like the sort of thing I was looking for. Except it wasn’t. 

Global Affiliate Zone was founded by two guys called Mathieu Jang and Julian Sherman. These guys had been part of the much bigger AWOL Academy that had been getting a fair bit of attention. 

 
Membership for Global Affiliate Zone was pitched at $99 per month. Okay, this still seemed quite high to me. But at least it wasn’t asking for three grand up-front like some of those other courses. I thought I could just sign up for a month and give it a go. If it wasn’t any good, it’s only a hundred bucks, right? 

For that, you’re offered a half-hour coaching call with one of their experts, as well as 3-hour mentor training online. This seemed like good value to me, I mean that’s 3 and a half hours of someone else’s time, which is worth the $99 alone. 

As well as that, there were also team group chats, access to the Global Affiliate Zone community, weekly workshops, training and tutorial videos, and tools like autoresponders and funnels. Awesome! Right? Well… 

I was expecting to see a load of general info and then help picking from a wide range of niches. Something where I could carve my own way, so to speak. Start my own venture. That’s what a lot of these online coaching courses were for. 

I slowly started to realize that these guys wanted me to promote THEIR OWN affiliate products, and that all the info was built towards doing just that. Yeah, there was some stuff I could take elsewhere, but practically everything was geared towards being part of the Global Affiliate Zone network. 

And what products did they want me to promote? Oh yeah, that same $99 a month membership I just signed up to. 

That meant I wasn’t learning how to research niches, pick products and promote a range of other affiliate products. It meant I was paying $99 a month to learn how to convince someone else to sign up for this $99 a month thing. 

That sounded A LOT like a pyramid scheme. 

You probably thought they were banned, right? I did too. 

These days, a lot of them get around it by calling themselves “network marketing” or “Multi-Level Marketing”. I soon learned about that. 

The thing is, not EVERY Multi-Level Marketing scheme is always bad. They sometimes get a bad rap, but there’s some reasonable stuff in there. 

I tend to think that if the product at the end of the network is of good value, there’s nothing wrong with people networking and marketing it on different commission levels. The problem comes when it’s just a cycle of marketing a product with no real value. 

So what about Global Affiliate Zone? 

You’re probably wondering what the commission was like. That’s what first got me interested. You get $29.70 for every member you sign up. That’s about a third of the first month. Not bad. 

But I was feeling a bit uneasy about trying to convince people to sign up to what I thought was an education course, but turned out to be an education in how to promote this education course. That wasn’t really an education course. Are you still with me? It was like a never-ending circle. Wait, isn’t that like most circles? 

So you’ve gotta sign up to the $99 a month thing before you can start making sales. Most other affiliate programs don’t actually make you buy the product before you can promote it. 

I also saw some of the smallprint on their site. This shocked me. I regretted not having a closer look BEFORE I signed up. 

That’s where I saw the estimate earnings for Global Affiliate Zone. They predict an average return of about $500-$2000 a year. Remember, you’re paying $99 a month which works out as $1188 annually. That means you might not even clear any profits at all. Even if you earn the upper-estimate, that’s about a grand profit for A LOT of work. You’d be better off getting a normal job. 

And can you really trust these guys on their estimates, either? I wasn’t sure if I could. 

At this point, I felt a little like I’d been scammed. The reality was, I could still make money by convincing OTHER people to join this thing. But then I’d be convincing people to sign up to something like THIS?! I didn’t feel comfortable with that. 

And that’s the problem with a lot of these MLM schemes. Once you’ve paid your money, you’re kinda incentivized to keep promoting this stuff even after you’ve realized how bad the product is. Some people might be desperate to make sales, and that’s not great for anyone. 

A lot of this is marketed as you promoting a filtration company called Enagic. There are a load of different tiered sales levels. You’ll get more commission the higher up you get. Should I say, higher up the pyramid? 

So there is kinda a product at the end of this. Enagic is a legit company. Only this affiliate network promoting them doesn’t seem it. And here’s the thing: You can actually sign up to promote Enagic independently, if you’ve really got a passion for ionization and water filtration. They’ve got their own affiliate system with training, tools, and everything else. Guess what? It’s free. No $99 a month membership, and no convincing people to sign up to another $99 a month membership. 

So, it’s a Global Affiliate Zone scam, right? 

It’s starting to look a lot like that. Especially when you look at the Global Affiliate Zone Affiliate Demo Walkthrough Video. That’s what I saw before I signed up. 

In it, your told how you’re gonna find the best products and services in the course, and loads more is implied. A lot of this didn’t turn out how I thought it would. There’s only one product, and you’ll also be competing with all the other GAZ members to drive traffic from the same channels they mention. The training and pre-made tools are all to help get people involved with GAZ and Enagic. 

So is it a scam? I’m starting to think so. If you do a search for Global Affiliate Zone BBB you’ll find some info on the Better Business Bureau. These guys rate all sorts of different companies, from the well-known to the not-so-well-known. 

 
They give Global Affiliate Zone a C-. This isn’t great, I’ve seen better. But I’ve also seen a lot worse. There are some complaints on there, but not too many. 

The problem is that the more people you recruit, the harder it’ll actually get for each of them to make money. That’s how diminishing returns works. 

When I learned all this, I decided I wasn’t happy promoting any of this stuff. You can decide for yourself if it’s worth it. But I decided it wasn’t. I cancelled. I wasn’t expecting THAT to be easy, but I managed after a bit of calling around. So it cost me $99, but at least that wasn’t TOO much. And at least I hadn’t wasted years trying to promote this stuff before I realized. 

When Ken got back from the Pacific, he laughed at me when I told him. He said people had been avoided GAZ for years. 

Ken! Why couldn’t you have been around earlier?! 

Not yet! 

The truth was, I never got that Lambo, OR that Ferrari. Not for a few years, anyway. 

 
Recently, I’ve started doing a lot better online. I’m now making real money. That’s thanks to Local Lead Generation. With it, you own your own slice of digital real estate and can start to get real passive income checks within a month or two. I’ve started getting them, and I’m looking forward to getting more. You should check it out. 

Are You Ready To Hear About Team National? Check Out One of the Best Team National Reviews Around

Hey, remember way back when you had to use your own phoneline to connect to the internet? And listen to those stupid noises for a few seconds every time it connected? 

 
Those were the days. I remember that too. 

The internet sure has come a long way since then. I actually made my first few affiliate marketing bucks back in those days. I like to call them the Wild West days of the internet. It wasn’t ’til I started making bank with my new Local Lead Generation business that I started to love the NEW internet. 

There was one other benefit to those old-school internet times. When you were surfing, your phoneline was blocked from annoying cold calls. 

Yeah—I know those cold calls have kinda just been replaced by spam emails, but I really used to hate those things. 

Since we live in the 21st Century—I’ve got a separate internet connection and phoneline. So I’ve started getting annoyed by those cold calls again. I don’t know why these guys bother. 

No, I did NOT have any problems with my computer. 

And no, I did NOT recently have a car accident. What is it with these people? 

Then one day I got a call. These guys asked me if I’d heard about Team National and if I wanted a place. 

I was like: wait… Me? 

You want me to join the national team? Awesome! 

Which sport?! 

I know I’d played a bit of basketball in college. But I was never THAT good. I know they’re struggling for players these days. But come on. Surely you don’t want me to play for Team USA? 

No Team USA callup for me 🙁 

No, they didn’t want me to play any sport for the national team. The USA national team or anyone else. Bummer. 

They wanted me to sign up to some sort of sales network. I was gonna make loads of money. Or so they said. 

Naturally, I thanked them for their time and hung up. Or, I just hung up. 

I don’t get involved with ANYTHING that’s pitched over the phone like that. I don’t even know if it was the guys from Team National itself or someone else who’d got involved with the scheme. As I soon learned, that’s kinda how it works. 

So I quickly forgot about Team National. A few months went by when I heard a colleague mention them too. He’d had a similar call, and was taking it a bit more seriously than I did. 

I decided I needed to do a bit more research. I didn’t want this guy to lose any money. The more I heard about Team National, the more fishy this “money-making opportunity sounded.” 

So if you’re looking for one of the best Team National reviews you can find—then keep reading to see what I found out after a bit more investigation. Check out my Team National review. 

Team National Review 

The first think you obviously wanna know is what exactly is Team National? That’s what I wanted to know too. The name doesn’t really help much, does it? 

So what exactly IS Team National? 

Let’s have a look… 

So Team National is what they call a “membership savings company”. They offer a range of discounts on regular retail purchases and from a range of different retailers. 

To get these discounts, you gotta sign up. 

And it ain’t cheap. 

$795 for a 2-year membership. 

Woah. 

That’s a LOT more than most other discount clubs I’ve seen. You can get tons of different discounts these days for FREE. 

But even for the discount schemes you DO have to pay for (like Coscto), we’re talking MUCH lower fees. 

 
So that’s the first thing that jumps out about Team National. 

I had a closer look at the actual specific retailers and discounts they were offering—and nothing was particularly groundbreaking. In my opinion. 

But wait a minute. I know what you’re thinking. 

What about Team National as a money-making opportunity? After all, that’s what you’re here for, right? 

Okay, so the real way Team National affiliates make money out of this is by convincing OTHER people to sign up to the discount membership. Team National agents get a cut every time they get someone to sign up to the main offer. 

That’s generally how Multi-Level Marketing networks like this work. They’ve taken a lot of flak in recent years. Some people still call them pyramid schemes, which MLM has become a byword for in some quarters. 

Personally, I don’t think ALL MLM schemes are pyramid schemes. I don’t think they’re ALL scams. The way I look at is like this: is the actual product (in this case discount membership) ACTUALLY worth it? If it is, then there’s nothing wrong with people marketing it and taking a cut. The problem is, the Team National discount scheme looks a bit scammy. And it’s super-expensive for what you get. That’s where I think there’s a problem when you get highly-motivated (sometimes desperate) salespeople pushing worthless products ONLY for personal gain. 

But what about Team National? Where do they fit in all this? 

It’s not looking good so far, but we need a bit more detail. 

One of the recommended Google searches for Team National is “Team National BBB”. 

These guys know their stuff. 

I first heard about the Better Business Bureau a while back when I was researching another venture. They’ve normally got the low-down on things. 

Let’s be real here, their BBB page isn’t that bad. I’ve seen a LOT worse. They’ve actually got a 5-Star A+ Rating. 

There ARE quit a few complaints though. And they don’t look good. 

I’ve seen some other Team National complaints elsewhere too. People complaining about not being able to even get any discounts, or simply being charged far too much for stuff that isn’t actually that much value. 

One big negative for Team National here is that they only offer a THREE DAY refund policy. That’s hardly any time at all to really evaluate what you’ve just spent money on. What if you’d been working all week and didn’t have time to check until the weekend? It seems like a cut-and-run attempt. 

There’s also some noise about pushy salespeople and a lot of hard-sell pitches. 

That’s another problem with Team National. They use a few questionable tactics, and these create sales agents that are arguably forced to push pretty hard for the sale. Let’s have a look at them: 

Sales agents have to make two sales a year in order to qualify for payouts. That’s already forcing them to make sales before they’ll even get any money. They’ve also gotta pay for things like a starter kit ($55) and more. This puts them out of pocket before things have even started. It looks like another way for Sales National to make even more money off the people who’re SUPPOSED to be helping them make money. 

That first sale? You’re not gonna see any commission from it. 

So how have the sales agents actually done? Not great. 

The income figures aren’t too appetizing. Over 85% of Team National Agents aren’t making any money at all. Average earnings weren’t much more than $600. 

What’s the most anyone made as a Team National agent? $5,435. That’s the top earner. Hardly a get-rich-quick scheme. Get poor slowly, more like. 

One important thing to remember with Team National is that you don’t ACTUALLY have to buy the discount membership plan yourself in order to become an agent and sell it. That reduces costs a bit. But you might have a hard time selling the product if you don’t even have it yourself. Or maybe not. 

So if you DID buy the plan before becoming an agent, the average earnings don’t even cover the cost of it. It looks like barely anyone is even making any money from Team National. Apart from Team National themselves, naturally. 

There are other tiers to the sales agent system. Like a pyramid. You’ll get more money if you recruit your own set of sales agents. This is how those pyramid schemes work. It’s not just about getting people to sign up to the discount membership product. That’s the ACTUAL Team National product. It’s also about getting more AGENTS to sign up under you. And who keeps making money from this? Team National. You got it. 

Save your money. 

Team National Scam—Yes or No? 

Okay, to answer this we gotta look at Team National on two levels. Is the discount membership a scam, and is the sales agent scheme a scam? I’m gonna answer both of these questions. 

If you want discount stuff, there are much better places to go. Especially with the internet these days. There are plenty of places to get cool discounts for free. There are also discount clubs that are legit and charge WAY less than Team National. 

 
However, it’s gonna be hard for me to outright say that the discount club is a complete scam. There are national retailers on there offering legit discounts. Nobody is running off with your money. 

BUT. And that’s a big but…. It’s still a bit scammy. That price. The TWO year plan (WHY?!). And most of all… the refund policy. There’s no reason a legit business like this should be offering a THREE DAY cancellation policy on something that costs so much and is for a two-year membership. It simply doesn’t add up. 

Now we come onto Team National as a money-making opportunity for sales agents. I’d say: Steer clear. It’s a bit scammy too. 

You don’t get commission straight away. You have to keep making sales to make any money. You’ve gotta pay a fair whack to even be an agent and most of all: barely anyone is making any money with this. Are those enough reasons to NOT wanna join Team National as either a discount member OR a sales agent?! I think so. 

Now I don’t wanna rat out the entire Multi-Level Marketing industry. It gets a bad rap already. Many people think ANY MLM scheme is automatically a pyramid scheme. Again, it the product is good at the base of the pyramid, I don’t see a problem with different levels of marketing and agents making money off of it. The problem REALLY starts when the actual thing people are selling is a load of crap, but people are still pushing it anyway. 

So what’s my verdict? Steer clear of Team National. It is possible to make a bit of cash, but it’s not easy. You’ll also be promoting a product that simply isn’t that great. 

So you’ve read this entire article looking for a money making opportunity, and I’ve told you to avoid one? What next? Easy. You need to try something where you really can make money, and that’s what I’ve been doing with my own Local Lead Generation business. It’s legit, and it’s making me good money for a while now. Check it out. 

What is iMarketsLive? Check Out My Review to Find Out If You Can Really Make Money With It

Let me tell you about this cool story from way back when. 

This was way back before I’d started making proper money with Local Lead Generation. This was before I’d even left High School. I’ll tell you more about how cool Local Lead Generation is later on. But I guess I was working with local leads in a slightly different way back then. 

I was camping out by the lake one summer, it was pretty dope. Loads of cool places to explore and have fun. 

Those were some cool summers. 

Once, me and my buddies were digging and we found this old tin. It was like lost treasure! 

We just thought it was gonna have some old crap in it, but when we opened it—it was actually a neat find. 

 
Baseball cards. Nice 

These were from the 50s, too. I knew already that they might have been valuable. They needed a little clean, but they were still in good condition. I guess the tin was well buried and air-tight. 

I already knew a few people I could sell these cards to. 

Anyway, the problem was—this wasn’t our land. One of my older pals said we should get permission from the landowner. It was his land after all. 

Now I’m a stand-up guy. So I was cool with that. I wasn’t about to steal these cards if someone else owned them. I knew the guy who owned the land and he was a chill older guy too. Used to give us sweets sometimes. 

I didn’t think he’d have much use for some baseball cards. 

I was wrong. 

But don’t worry, it’s not all bad. 

You see, the baseball cards WERE his. But when I told him about them, instead of simply thanking me and asking for them back… He had another idea. 

Not only did he have an idea. He had MORE. More baseball cards. From the 50s, 60s and beyond. Rare stuff. You name it. 

And these hadn’t been buried either. They were in mint condition. 

So we struck an agreement. I’d try and sell his cards, bit by bit, and I’d get a nice 30% cut. I was happy with that. He had tons. 

I’d been saving for a new bike at the time so it was a cool deal. Over the rest of the summer my mind was focussed on shifting these baseball cards. I sold them to the shops around town, some older collectors, and even some people over at the local baseball clubhouse. I was soon raking in my sweet cut of 30%. 

By the end of summer, I’d paid for more than my bike. Way more. 

But where am I going with this? Why am I telling you it? I’m telling you this story because it was my first taste of affiliate marketing. I just didn’t know it yet. 

So I guess you can say my entrepreneurial efforts started early. But over the next couple of decades, I tried my hand at a lot more. 

When the internet first got big, I even made some nice affiliate cash. But I still hadn’t got to where I really wanted to be. In a Lambo, of course! What else? Every online marketing guy needs a Lamborghini. 

Anyway, I devoured a lot of different internet marketing courses and products over the next few years. I learned the basics, and then some. I found out what autoresponders were, why emailing lists were important, and all that stuff. 

Eventually, I started building up some nice savings. No, still not Lambo money. But I wanted to see this money grow, so I needed some cool investments. 

 
I’d heard a fair bit about something called iMarketslive at the time. This seemed like the perfect product because it was gonna teach me how to trade Forex and other stocks online instantly—but also because I’d get to promote the product as part of my affiliate marketing efforts. 

That’s when my heart sank a bit.  

This sounded a lot like a pyramid scheme. But I was assured that wasn’t the case. So if you found this page by banging in “iMarketsLive reviews” or “iMarketsLive scam”, then here you are. I’ve gotta give you one of the best iMarketsLive reviews going. Here it is: 

iMarketsLife Review 

First thing’s first. You wanna know what iMarketsLive is. I got you. 

It’s an online Forex trading platform. Now I didn’t know the first thing about Forex trading at this point. I’d seen how volatile the USD could be on a day to day basis, and I knew there was money to be made. I just wanted to know how. 

 
The second part of iMarketsLive was the network marketing part. They call this MultiLevel Marketing, or MLM. Instead of just trying to promote the iMarketsLive training course, I’d be trying to recruit more sales reps, move up levels and gain more commission. 

That’s a lot like a pyramid scheme. 

My main issue with these sorts of deals is when desperate people are forced to sell worthless products. When the ONLY way for anyone to make money is simply building more levels to the pyramid and getting more sales reps to sign up-that’s not good. 

I didn’t have a problem with using networks to promote products if the product is actually good. That means people at the bottom of the pyramid still get value—the training course. 

Although I did question why you’d need multiple levels of sales reps to make real money. Why couldn’t I just find people that wanted the base product (the training course) and make money selling it? That’s what I did with my other affiliate marketing ventures. That’s what I did with my baseball cards. 

So I was already a bit suspicious. But firstly, I needed to know if the product was any good. That was what I was there for, anyway. The Forex training. Then if it went well, maybe I’d be happy to be part of the pyramid-shaped thingy to help spread the word a bit. 

So what’s the iMarketLive Forex training actually like? Let’s have a look… 

To start with, there’s a ton of info in there. It was hard to work out where to start. 

I didn’t know much about these currencies! 

I was a bit sceptical as to why they were giving this stuff away. 

I mean if they’d really cracked how to make money in Forex, why don’t they just keep the info to themselves and invest their own money? 

Surely if it was that easy, they could just become Forex investors. That’s the problem with a lot of these sales pitches. Not just Forex training academies, either. All sorts of IM offers fall over because if they really did what they say they do—then the people selling them wouldn’t NEED to sell them. It might even be better if they didn’t. So as you can tell, suspicions were high. 

And I’ve already answered my own question. The reason they need to sell this stuff is because it simply ISN’T that easy to make a ton of money on Forex trading. I soon learned that. 

There was some cool stuff in the training course. I learned all the basics and then some. Great. The thing is, this info is available elsewhere, sometimes for free. Or at least at a fraction of the cost. 

The good news is that I learned how to read graphs, and a lot of other stuff that was crucial to Forex trading. Not just basic graphs, CANDLESTICK graphs. Nice. These made a lot more sense much quicker than I thought they would. 

And there are loads of other alert tools and some other good stuff in the iMarketsLive software. You also get access to the trading room which lets you learn from some much more experienced traders. You could see the sort of moves they were making as well as the ones to avoid. 

The thing with Forex trading is you don’t have to hold thousands in stock or currency. You can simply “bet” per point it goes up or down. This is called spot betting. What it means is that you can become mega-rich without risking tons of money. But you can also lose a lot, too. 

So how did I do? It was a mixed bag. 

I started making some losses over the first few days. But after I learned from a few of my mistakes, I’d finally recovered and was even making a nice profit. Woo! 

Forex is as volatile as it gets. 

Awesome, right? 

 
Well… 

I thought I’d cracked it. I was already dreaming of Maui or my new Lambo. I hadn’t cracked it. It was beginner’s luck. 

 
I took the wrong position on my next trade and was wiped out pretty quick. And then some. Bummer. 

I spent about a month on iMarketsLive and trying to become a Forex trader. There was too much up and down for my heart to handle. That stuff was stressful. 

Of course, your mileage may vary. Some people do make money from this stuff. I didn’t, but that’s just how it is. 

My overall evaluation of the course is that’s it was good. It wasn’t groundbreaking, and I’m not sure how many people are actually making money. I’m also not sure if it was really worth the fee. But it wasn’t terrible. 

There are actually a load of different tools aside from simply using the trading course. Some of them you’ve gotta pay a bit more for, so I didn’t get to try them. 

There’s an FX Signal package which basically does it all for you. They say you get the instant trades that pros are making and you simply set the system up to automatically follow them. Again, I’m not sure if this is really legit. But I can’t knock it down because I didn’t try it. I do have that same nagging question about why someone would give this info away if it was guaranteed to work? And wouldn’t it affect the market in some way? I’m no Forex expert, so I don’t really know the answers to these questions. 

 
Answers on a postcard, please! 

So the next step was seeing whether I could make money promoting the trading course. That’s where things get a bit pyramid-shape. 

 
The real money wasn’t to be made from the actual info you get in the course. 

It wasn’t even really to be made from selling the course to individual users. 

It was from getting more salespeople to sign up under you, and taking a cut of all their commissions. 

That’s kinda how MLM works, which is cool if the product at the bottom is good. But I’m always a bit suspicious of these MLM schemes because if the product was THAT good, you’d have loads of normal customer-facing affiliate marketing guys lining up to promote the product directly to users. That’s not really how this works, which is a bummer. 

Also, there’s one MASSIVE catch here as well. 

You can only really open up the multi-level earning potential if you buy their $195 customer product. Yep, read that again if you want. Let it sink in. 

Now where I come from in the affiliate marketing world, you don’t even have to buy the products you promote at all. Let alone pay nearly two-hundred bucks just to start selling at the higher levels. 

THAT’S just how pyramid schemes work. At least there’s a reasonably good product at the bottom, but it’s still not a great deal. You shouldn’t have to pay to promote, and the main way it seems like people are making money off of this is by selling more of these promoter packages. Very pyramidy. 

There’s a complex matrix of membership tiers that I won’t bore you with here. But basically—As you move up a level, you’ll get higher commission bonuses. But it’ll cost you to get there. 

So you think it’s an iMarketsLive scam, right? 

I did too. 

What do I think now? 

I’m not sure. 

It’s not a definite scam. I think that’s clear. They’re not running off with your money. 

The other good thing is that there is a product at the bottom of the pyramid. That’s something that has value and COULD help people. It’s not the best product around, but it’s ok. I learned something from it. You could too. 

However, I didn’t learn much that did me any good. Forex trading wasn’t for me. I question how much people are making money from this stuff, too. I wanted an investment to put some of the money I’d been making from internet marketing in. This wasn’t it. 

I also wasn’t really that happy promoting the product to other people. After all, it was something they could lose money on. A lot of it. 

 
The only way people were really making money was with the MLM network. There are people doing well there, but that wasn’t for me either. I prefer not to pay to promote products. There’s also a pretty small market of people who’d be willing to buy a product at this price, especially when similar stuff is available for free elsewhere. Oh yeah, the trading platform costs $145 a month if I forgot to mention. 

Nowadays, I prefer pointing people in the direction of Local Lead Generation if they’re looking for a way to make real money online. It’s not a pyramid scheme and is a genuine way to make real money. It’s how I made most of mine. Check it out.