Check Out This Amway Review to See if It’s Really for You

There was this time when I really wanted this brand new toy. Yeah. I was younger then. Weren’t we all? The thing is, I didn’t even like LEGO that much, so I didn’t know WHY I had to have it. 

But I did. I just had to have it. 

Maybe it was FOMO. Loads of kids in my class already had the toy. I wanted it too. 

But I soon learned a few things the hard way. 

Everyone wants to get rich quick. 

 
Firstly, you can’t just get what you want straight away. You gotta WORK for it. 

But also… Sometimes when you get that thing—It isn’t everything you thought it was gonna be. The thrill of the chase is sometimes better than the prize. 

These are important lessons. They’re ones everyone has to learn sometime. 

That’s why I’ve always been a bit sceptical about these “Get Rich Quick” schemes. You see them all over the place. Especially on the internet these days. 

I’d recently started making some real money with Local Lead Generation. it’s a great gig, and I’ll tell you more about it later. But I also know there are a lot of less-legit gigs in the marketing world. 

I’ve kinda made it my mission to drill down on these and let you know which are legit and which aren’t. That’s because I’ve seen loads of my buddies get burned by some of these schemes, and it’s not fun to see happen. 

So when a few of my pals were chatting about Amway, I knew I needed to do a bit more investigation. To me, this sounded like a bus company or something—but no, Amway is apparently a legit venture that helps people start their own work-from-home businesses to promote a range of products. 

But is it really legit? That’s the question. 

There’s nothing wrong with home selling. You’ve seen how long Avon have been around. Totally legit. No argument here. 

But there’s also a load of… let’s just say “less” legit players out there. A lot of stuff that seems awfully like pyramid schemes. Despite their protestations that they are definitely NOT pyramid schemes. Nope. Nothing to see here. Move along please… 

So if you’ve got this far, you probably wanna know the nitty gritty about Amway. You’re in luck. That’s what this Amway review is here for. I actually signed up and jumped right in so I can give you the lowdown on whether Amway is something you should be joining, or avoiding like the plague. So let’s have a look… 

That’s Amway… Not Tramway. 

Amway Review 

Ok, first thing’s first—you’ve got a question. It’s a simple question. What even is Amway? 

Amway is a direct product selling business. It’s actually been around a long time. That normally stands for something, right? I mean, if something has been established for however many decades like Amway has, then it must be legit, right? 

Not necessarily. 

Look, this isn’t a complete Amway scam. They aren’t running off with your money. So in that respect, it’s legit. But is it really worth it? I’m not so sure. 

Keep reading to find out why. 

You see, Amway is a product selling business that makes you buy their products before you sell them on to other people. 

This isn’t too bad in itself. I mean, it’s not like affiliate marketing where you can promote products without even buying them. Those are cool. But most businesses require you to hold stock. So this isn’t a problem. 

 
However, as I soon found out… this wasn’t a great way to make money. 

Firstly, the product line was limited. You’re left promoting less than great stuff. Oh yeah, you also have to promote it to people you know, rather than have some larger-scale online business venture. After all, these products aren’t really very unique. 

So that’s not so good. 

You’re probably wondering where people are really making money with Amway. Well that’s where things start to get a bit more pyramid-shaped. 

Yes, you guessed it. Like a pyramid scheme. 

What?! Another Pyramid! 

 
The real money with Amway isn’t with buying and selling regular products like a normal business. It’s with hiring other sellers UNDER you to promote even more products. Bummer. 

So the real money is made by having a network of other sellers that you’ve recruited. You take a cut from all their fees. 

 
Now I think some of these Multi Level Marketing gigs get a bad rap. There’s nothing wrong with requiting different levels of promoters if the products at the bottom of the pyramid are still good. In other words, if even the guy at the bottom who hasn’t recruited any more sellers still manages to make some cash, then it’s all good. 

The real problem is when those at the bottom can never really make any money. If the ONLY way to make money with a system is by recruiting other sellers on a never-ending cycle of dreaming about selling “products” but failing—then things aren’t so great. 

 
And that’s what Amway is like. 

 
Their product selection is poor. 

I was like: wait, you want me to sell this crap? What else can I sell? Who am I even supposed to be selling it to? Nobody is gonna want this. 

That’s when it was suggested that I recruit more sellers under me to start making real bank. Oh okay. I get it. Like a pyramid scheme? Yep, you got it. 

And that’s the problem with things like Amway. The regular product sellers simply aren’t making any money. This isn’t a legit business opportunity in the mould you were probably hoping for. 

It wasn’t what my pals were looking for either, and that’s probably why nearly all of them have failed with Amway. 

Did I mention that you’ve got to jump through a few hoops to remain qualified at Amway so you can continue to “earn”? There’s a minimum monthly spend to remain qualified for commission. This wasn’t something I was happy with. I heard of some sellers actually buying products they didn’t need and couldn’t sell just so they could remain active. Ouch. 

Amway has been around for over 50 years, so they must be doing something right. What that is, I’m not sure. 

They’ve actually got quite an aggressive recruitment drive. I’d been approached to join a few times already. Now I know how a lot of these things work so it’s always been easy for me to say no. But for other people who’re a bit more desperate, it isn’t always that easy. That’s why I don’t like how these schemas prey on certain sorts of people. That’s why I’m here telling you that you PROBABLY want to avoid Amway. There are loads more legit ways to make money online. (we’ll get to that in a bit). 

On the recruitment drive I was told I wouldn’t need any sales skills. Now I’ve never been much of a salesperson, so this got me interested straight off the bat. Trouble is, it wasn’t really true. 

That’s because Amway IS a sales job. That’s basically the only way to make money. Either by selling the products or selling more sales positions. 

This was a big negative for me. And get this, I talked to loads of people who’d been doing Amway for a while. Hardly any of them were making good money. All the actual GOOD salespeople had quit Amway already to make money with proper jobs. So those who were left were people without any real sales skills. 

You’ll be given the hard sell with a load of “success stories”. These are pretty standard in this industry but the reality is that they’re a load of nonsense. They might be true. I really have no idea. But they aren’t a true representation of what’s gonna happen for you with Amway. Unless you get REALLY lucky. 

I’ve yet to meet anyone who’s actually had real success with Amway. I think that tells you all you need to know. So I think those stories you get are completely made up. Maybe they’re not. But maybe they were from a time when Amway was actually a viable way to make money. After all, Amway has been around for over 50 years. They must have been doing something right at some point. But I can’t see what that is right now. 

You can already tell I’m being pretty negative about Amway. Sue me. I gotta be honest for you guys. 

The good news is that they ARE a legit business and shouldn’t be running off with your money. But that’s about as good as it gets. I’ve never really been a fan of those pyramid schemes. And while there are a lot worse ones out there. There are also a lot better ways to make money. 

Oh and there’s one more thing that pissed me off. These motivational stories aren’t thrown at you for free, either. You’re not gonna believe this—but you gotta pay for them too! 

What?! 

This was crazy to me. Like you have to pay in order to have the privilege of being conned into buying the rest of their stuff. I didn’t get it. So I refused. That’s when another guy on the course “loaned” me his promotional material. When I saw it, I couldn’t believe he’d actually paid money for it himself. 

At this point, things got even fishier. Someone got onto me from “higher up”. They were worried that I was gonna give away these CDs and MP3s for free. 

This had me dumbfounded. 

I mean, this is all promotional material that’s designed to get people to buy in to Amway and their products. 

 
Every other affiliate marketing system I’d been involved in gave this stuff away for FREE. Some other programs were super happy for me to have ALL SORTS of content. For nothing. 

Yet here were Amway getting a bit fussy over a few CDs and stuff. 

You know why? It was because this was just another upline revenue stream for Amway. You got it. It wasn’t a way to actually promote their business. It was a way to sell more stuff. 

And let me tell you, there wasn’t much value in them. Who wants to pay for promotional material like this? I know I didn’t. 

Oh yeah, let’s get the popcorn in and watch a movie tonight. What’s the movie?…………. An Amway promotional video. 

Amway really starts to fall down when you start to look at who’s making money from it. 

On average, Amway IBOs (that’s the qualified seller level) made a loss of $1.176 per year. Yes, there are some people who made money. Some of them even made having-a-job money. But I didn’t know anyone who did THAT well from it. 

 
All the people I met in my first few weeks with Amway were struggling, or they’d given up and jumped onto the next big idea. I met a lot of people at the first few meetings and a lot of these were motivated guys who wanted to find the next way to get rich. Trouble is, it wasn’t Amway. I hadn’t seen ANYONE get rich from this. 

So if you’re gonna ask me if I think Amway’s worth it—It’s a bit fat no from me. They aren’t the worst online marketing business I’ve ever seen. SOME people make money. But there are simply so many better ways to go about things. 

One of the best ways to make money these days is with a real legit online venture. It’s something I’ve been doing a lot of recently, and it’s called Local Lead Generation. This stuff is as cool as it gets. You need to check it out ASAP instead of pyramid schemes like Amway. You’ll be glad you did. 

Check Out My Online Trading Academy Review To Find Out If It’ll Work For You

It’s one of the best Online Trading Academy Reviews Around—My Findings Are Inside… 

I always remember this Rolls Royce that was parked in my neighborhood. 

Man, I used to love that car. 

It was owned by this cool old guy. He’d worked his whole life in a regular job to save for it. Treated himself when he retired. Sometimes he’d take me for a ride around the block, or pay me to clean it. 

This guy had worked 70-hour weeks more often than not. He deserved that cool car. 

I want a Rolls Royce too. 

Trouble is, I don’t really like the sound of 70-hour weeks. I don’t really wanna work that much in a MONTH. 

Man, I wanted one of those! 

You might say I’m lazy. You might be right. But we’ve all gotta dream. 

So I’ve always been on the lookout for a way to get-rich-quick. That’s why I was first drawn to the idea of becoming a day-trader. Stocks and Forex and the like. Truth is I didn’t know the first thing about any of those things, but I liked the idea of sitting by the beach sipping a cocktail while my portfolio grew and grew. 

As I soon learned, making money is never that easy. 

This was way before I’d started making some real bank with Local Lead Generation. That’s as cool as it gets, and I’ll fill you in on it in a bit. 

 
But first, back to that stock-trading dream I had. 

Since I realized I didn’t know the first thing about it, I knew I needed to learn more. That’s when I first heard about something called Online Trading Academy. 

If you wanna know more about THAT, then you’re in the right place. 

I did a bit more research and saw some good reviews. I decided to jump in. I was gonna be a money-making trader within weeks, right? Maybe not. 

In the end, Online Trading Academy was quite a journey. If you wanna hear about it, then you’re in the right place with my Online Trading Academy review. 

Online Trading Academy Review 

First thing’s first—you wanna know what Online Trading Academy actually is. I got you. 

It’s basically exactly what it says it is. It’s an education course that aims to train normal people like you and me to be profitable traders. 

They’ve actually got a range of different products you can buy. 

This whole gig started with an “orientation” day. I had to meet with someone called an Education Counsellor. That’s really just a fancy name for a sales rep. And man, do they sell you the dream. I was gonna have that Rolls and more within months, according to them. I was pretty hyped, but also dubious. 

So the orientation day was a half-day course. They didn’t tell me much, but they made sure they made everything sound awesome, and easy. After that, I’d have to pay $300 for a 3-day course. This seemed a bit much, but I thought that if those 3 days gave me the info to become a profitable day-trader, it’d be all good. 

It soon transpired that the 3-day course was ANOTHER sales pitch. Just a longer one. We were taught a few bits about trading and the differences between markets and what a lot of the terms meant. Useful info, I guess—but nothing you can’t get elsewhere for free.  

At the course, I met a lot of other people who were in a similar position to me. Some of them were pretty cool. 

One thing I did notice was how many older folks were on the course. A lot of retired guys. I soon realized that this was the core audience for Online Trading Academy. 

The main pitch was to get you to sign up for more classes. More expensive classes. They said they had a patented trading technique that was a guaranteed way to make money. 

I’m not sure how you can patent a trading technique, but I was intrigued. I’m also not sure why they aren’t just printing money with this technique themselves, if it was really that easy. 

It’s worth remembering that this Online Trading Academy is NOT an online course. It’s a course to train for online trading. You still gotta visit a bricks-and-mortar location to get your training on-site. This isn’t one of those remote deals. I was a bit disappointed by that news, but at least they had plenty of locations to attend. 

Things were getting fishy. 

Anyway, at the end of the first bit of info (what I call: the sales pitch) you fill out a questionnaire. This is the main crux of their business model. This is where they find out how much money you’re playing with. I was surprised by how many people simply freely gave up all their financial details. They’d already bought into the dream-sell. 

And it’s at this point things got fishier. The team of sales reps started seriously targeting those older guys. The people who probably had more spare cash. The people with retirement funds. Some other guys who basically turned up with nothing (like a lot who’re chasing these sort of dreams) got ignored. 

And THAT’S because the next range of training cost a truck-load. We’re talking many thousands here. I was on the borderline because I didn’t have a ton of cash, but I wasn’t poor. The sales team were already pushing hard on the old folk. 

There’s a 7-day course for $8,000 or a longer one (a couple of weeks) that comes in at $19,000. Wow. That’s not chicken feed. 

At this point, I had two options. Spend a LOT of cash on something I wasn’t truly convinced about… Or walk away from the dream. But what about the Rolls? 

What decision would you make at this point? I’d already seen enough deals like this go wrong, and the price of the longer course was about all I had. 

So what did I do? 

I know you’re reading this review wanting ALL the info, but if I’m honest with you—I did a runner. 

The first day or so of meetings hadn’t reassured me anything about their info. The trouble was, a lot of people had been even more sucked in than me. I was worried about them. 

But maybe I’m just being overly picky? I still wanted to know more about Online Trading Academy. Maybe I’d made a mistake in walking away? 

On the course, I met a guy called Roger. Roger was a bit older, recently retired. He had some money to play with, but he also wanted more. He was saving for a condo in Florida for the winters. 

Roger’s dream condo. 

Roger was a chill dude. Had some cool stories. 

Problem was, he’d bought into the Online Trading Academy bigtime. Hook, line and sinker. I tried to tell him to tread with caution as this seemed a lot like a scam. I managed to meet up with Roger a few months later and he filled me in on how it all went. So the rest of this review’s kinda from his perspective. More on that in a minute. 

I’m always a bit suspicious of these sort of sales deals. I know there’s nothing wrong with getting an education, but I always wonder why these guys are selling such groundbreaking info if they’re cracked the markets themselves. 

Surely giving it away is just gonna make it harder for them to make money themselves with their own great system? 

Why wouldn’t you just keep that stuff to yourself and actually make loads of money actually trading? 

Maybe I’m giving them too much flak. Maybe I’m thinking from a selfish perspective. These guys just wanna share the knowledge, right? 

Or maybe their “system” isn’t actually that great. Maybe they don’t actually know how to turn a nobody into a money-making machine. 

Maybe the only way they know how to make money is by selling the dream, rather than living it. 

Even though I’d already walked away from the Online Trading Academy, I still wanted to know more. I did my own research, and I also checked in with Roger. 

The first bit of research I did was to check out the Better Business Bureau. These guys give the lowdown on all sorts of companies you might not have heard of. So I rammed “Online Trading Academy BBB” into Google and visited the site. 

The good: It’s got an A+ Rating. Nice. I’ve seen a lot worse. 

But there are also a LOAD of complaints. And some of them are way worse than just not liking the product. Some people felt seriously ripped off—out of A LOT of money. Some were unable to cancel and were charged thousands. 

What about Roger, how did he got on? He had a similar experience. 

He ended up signing up for a $16,000 boatload of courses. They lasted a couple of weeks. Roger signed up to pay in instalments, so only paid the first $3,000. That’s both good and bad. 

In reality, Roger told me that their patented trading idea wasn’t up to much. Just like I’d thought. With all the info Roger learned, he didn’t have enough to become a profitable trader. 

The reality of that game is that it’s MUCH harder than it looked. 

So Roger tried to cancel and back out of the rest of the payments. This wasn’t possible. He was out all that cash in the end. And no closer to his dreams of the condo in Florida. Further away if anything. 

I felt bad for Roger, but at least he still had some cash left. There were people in much more volatile financial positions on the course. I was worried about them. 

That’s some chunk of change. 

But I was also relieved. After all, I only lost $300. It could have been worse. MUCH worse. 

The more research I do on Online Trading Academy, the more sceptical I’m becoming. Had anyone made any money from this? 

I even heard some rumors that the sales reps themselves were struggling. Roger also told me that the “pro picks” he’d been so hyped about didn’t add up to much. There weren’t any “pro” traders in the Online Trading Academy anyway. It seemed like there were just salespeople. 

But what about those reviews I mentioned? How comes there was such a dramatic difference between MY experience and those other people? 

Maybe those guys got lucky. 

Or maybe… Those reviews are just trying to sell you Online Trading Academy. 

There’s a lot of that around, and you’ve gotta take every review you read about things like Online Trading Academy with a pinch of salt. Even this one. 

So it’s an Online Trading Academy scam then? 

If it looks like a scam, smells like a scam, and tastes like a scam. It’s a scam. 

The good news is that it’s NOT a pyramid scheme. I’ve seen a few of those in this industry where the course or product barely even exists. The only real way to make money with them is recruiting more sales reps. 

This does have a course, and it takes a few weeks. That’s obviously gonna cost some time and money. But this much money? I don’t think so. 

I was put off by the predatory practices I saw when I first visited the taster session.  This wasn’t for me, but it was off-putting how many other people had got sucked in. 

And what about the actual info learned in the course? Listen, I learned a bit on the first day, and Roger did learn SOME STUFF. It’s not completely without value. But the guarantees they offer about potential earnings and how easy it’s gonna be are way off the mark. 

Trading like this ain’t easy. 

If it was then everyone’d be doing it. If it was then Online Trading Academy would be doing it themselves instead of selling way over-priced courses. The reality is, you can learn a lot of this info for FREE online. Or at least with some Udemy courses that only set you back a few bucks. 

All these reasons are why I decided that the Online Trading Academy is not something I’d be recommending to my buddies. You can make that decision yourself, but I hope I’ve helped. 

If you wanna know about a real way to make money online, you should check out Local Lead Generation. I actually showed Roger this, and he’s doing much better now. Local Leads are really taking off and it’s a cool way to set up your own bit of internet-realty. It’s not a get-rich-quick scheme, and I’m not gonna tell you you’re gonna be a millionaire in weeks… But those kind of sales pitches are normally scams anyway, right? 

But I’m glad I found Local Lead Generation. Roger is too. 

Primerica Review

When I was young, I always wanted to be the next big baseball start 

Haha. I know you’ve all had dreams like that. 

 
Trouble is, I wasn’t actually that good at baseball. Ouch. 

Yeah I used to play every day in the summer with my pals. We had a great time. Sometimes, the dream is better than actually getting there. 

You see, I wanted to be a baseball star because I LOVED the sport. I dreamed of hitting that winning homer in the World Series one day. 

Living the dream. 

My pal Buck was different. 

 
Man, this guy had talent. 

You should have seen his right arm. I would have killed for it. Maybe. 

The problem with Buck was that while he had all the talent you could ask for, he had none of the desire. 

Yeah, he wanted the fast cars and fast women—but he never really wanted to put the work in. 

So after a few failed attempts at trials for big colleges, he ended up with a Division 2 NCAA team. At college, he partied all the time. 

 
I didn’t blame him, not one bit. 

But he was throwing this talent away, bigtime. 

What’s Buck doing these days? He’s selling used cars. There’s nothing wrong with that, but he could have lived the dream. That car lot could have been his own. 

For me, things went a bit different. I didn’t have that natural talent, but I did have a good work ethic. 

I was always hustling. 

 
By the time Buck was realizing he was about to get cut from his Minor League team, I’d already bought my first investment condo. 

You see, I’d got into internet marketing just at the right time. I’d had some good success, but I’d also had some major failures. 

 
Boy, if only I could tell you about all those failures. We haven’t got all day. 

There were some big successes too. Like Local Lead Generation which I’m into BIGTIME right now. It’s as legit as they come. More on that in a bit. 

Anyway, let’s just say I’d seen a lot of shoddy operators in my time. In fact, I’d kinda become the local authority on any of this stuff with all my Buddies. 

Now we get back to Buck. 

You see, Buck hadn’t been making enough to support his family at the car lot. Times were hard. He’d recently been convinced by his brother to get involved with something called Primerica. 

I was like, “Oh… okay. Are you sure?” 

But he was all in. 

If only he’d had this sort of motivation back in the day when the baseball scouts were calling. All he wanted to do then was play on his SNES or smoke weed. Idiot. 

Anyway, I’d seen a few of these sort of scams before in my time. Is this a Primerica Scam? You need to check out my Primerica review to find out. I had a closer look. Perhaps that means you don’t have to now. 

Primerica Review 

What even IS Primercia? 

Insurance sales. That’s what Buck said anyway. 

 
Okay, got it. 

Wait, no I haven’t,. 

You’re gonna become an insurance salesperson?! 

I guess you DO know how to sell cars. Sometimes. 

Firstly, Primerica is known as part of the MLM world. 

 
What IS MLM, I hear you ask? 

 
Multi Level Marketing. 

Okay, you’re still non the wiser, right? 

That was me when someone first fired those letters at my brain. 

Don’t worry, I got you. 

MLM is basically like a pyramid scheme. SOMETIMES. 

They’re not all bad. There are actually some legit ones out there. 

It’s where you market products on a different level and get promoted to a higher network in order to get better commission. 

Some of these CAN be a bit fishy, but I’m alright with them if the products at the bottom of the pyramid are actually of any value. Sometimes they are, sometimes they’re not. 

In my opinion, that’s what makes an MLM scheme either GOOD or BAD. The PRODUCTS. 

Only Primerica was a bit different here, so it took me a while to get my head around it. They weren’t selling ACTUAL products like some of these other “schemes”. They were selling…. insurance. 

Okay. Insurance. Great. 

 
Everyone needs that, right? 

 
I get can involved with that. 

So I had all sorts of questions lined up for Buck. What kind of insurance? How good was it? How much can we make? How easy is it to sell? HOW are we actually supposed to sell it? 

Trouble is, I didn’t really know the first thing about being an insurance salesman. Neither did Buck. DESPITE already being a salesman. 

You’re losing faith in Buck here, aren’t you? 

I was too. 

So over the next few weeks I dived into Primerica so I could find out what the deal was. Hopefully, I was gonna find answers to all those questions and more. 

Did I? 

Let’s have a look… 

The first hurdle was that actually RESEARCHING Primerica was pretty hard. These guys, like Amway, have been around for decades. You’ve probably already heard of them at some point. 

They rang a bell in the back of my head but I wasn’t sure where from. 

For something that’s been around for so long and SUPPOSEDLY helped so many people make money, it was super-hard to actually find anything out on them. 

Seems fishy, right? I always liked a bit of fish, especially cod or haddock. But NOT when I’m trying to see if a company is legit online or not. 

Very fishy. 

The thing is, when you search for something like “Primerica review” or “Primerica scam”, you actually get a load of marketing spam from people trying to PROMOTE Primerica. 
 
You probably saw this when you made those searches yourself. 

Finding valuable info like on this here site isn’t always easy. Especially when more than half the other Google options are people actually trying to sell you Primerica. I’ve developed a bit of sense for separating bullshit reviews from those offering real value, but not everyone is like me. 

That’s why you need this review. 

So I attended a couple of Primerica promotional events to get a grip of things,. 

That’s when things actually started looking up. For a bit. 

 
Primerica wasn’t like a lot of those other MLM schemes I’d seen. 

There are a ton of Primerica agents and their job was to try and get me to join up. Fair enough so far, I thought. 

Primerica was gonna train me to become a financial adviser. This isn’t something you can really be good at if you aren’t a good financial planner. Things weren’t looking good for Buck at this point. Sorry Buck. 

Anyway, I liked my chances. And what differentiated Primerica from a lot of those other pyramiddy things is that I’d have to train and pass an exam before I was allowed to offer financial advice. 

While that barrier to entry was sure to put a number of people off, it also put me at ease slightly. This wasn’t one of those deals where they simply invited anyone who could pay onboard. Or did they? 

Then things sadly started returning to form. This structure started looking a bit more like a pyramid than I’d first hoped. 

 
I was disappointed, but I can’t say I was surprised. 

The hard sell was in full-swing at this point. And oh yeah, I was highly encouraged to “protect” myself with their insurance plan before anything really got started. 

There’s a lot of hype around all these products and I didn’t really understand why I needed them. Buck definitely didn’t understand either. Poor Buck. 

Remember when I said a scheme lives and dies by the quality of their products? Well now I knew a bit more about what Primerica were offering, I could make a slightly better judgement. 

Or, I thought I could. 

 
Trouble was, this stuff was confusing. Even for me. And I consider myself pretty clever with financial stuff like this. Buck didn’t stand a chance. 

As I said, there were a lot of products, there was a lot of hype, and there was a big hard-sell. 

I also saw an internal document that was encouraging people to start selling BEFORE they’d actually qualified as state-licensed financial advisors. That was even more fishy. After all, that’s why I first started liking Primerica as an idea. I was gonna become state-qualified, right? 

Only they wanted me to start selling and “advising” way before that. I was gonna tell people that I was currently studying to become licensed, and that was enough? 

How many people actually ended up getting licensed? I didn’t know the answer. Can’t help you. 

There’s also loads of training on some pretty hard-sell type stuff. 

I hated these sorts of gigs. If something was good enough, it shouldn’t need a hard sell. 

The products should ALWAYS speak for themselves. 

Despite being a used car salesman, Buck didn’t really like the hard sell either. Buck has a lot of faults, but he’s a cool guy. He was always one of those relaxed salesmen who let people decide for themselves on the most part. This wasn’t for him, either. 

In fact, Buck was pretty confused at this point. I don’t blame him. I was too. How were we actually gonna make money from this stuff? 

I had yet to see anyone who had. I still haven’t. 

Another one of those. 

You’ve probably already guessed the best way to make money from Primerica. That’s right, recruiting more “advisors” under you. THAT’S always the kicker with pyramid schemes like this. 

Primerica doesn’t even deny being a pyramid scheme in their internal literature. Someone leaked that and I managed to see a bit of it. 

Actually, you couldn’t really officially start selling some of the products until you were licensed, but you COULD recruit more people under you to make commission that way. Especially as each trainee advisor was highly encouraged to buy some insurance for themselves at the start. 

Don’t worry, I didn’t fall for that. 

Look, Primerica isn’t a complete scam. It’s not awful. The products at the bottom aren’t COMPLETELY useless. They’ve got a range of financial instruments, and some of them could be for you. If I’m honest, I was still a bit confused at this point so I didn’t really know if they WERE any good or not. 

Their main product is called “Term Life” insurance. 

I did a bit more digging on this. 

 
Term life insurance is like life insurance but just for a specified term. Sounds simple, right? So you could be covered for ten or twenty years rather than for the rest of your life. 

Problem is, Primerica’s term life insurance is actually quite a lot more expensive than some of the competitors in that industry. 

But hey, That’s not TOO bad, right? 

I mean, I’ve seen some pyramid scams in the past where the basic products at the bottom of the pyramid are completely WORHTLESS. 

At least this was legit insurance. It was just a bit more expensive. 

Another thing: you probably won’t qualify for Primerica if you’re in a high risk group. Okay, fine. It’s still viable for plenty of people, 

What I’m trying to get at here is that there ARE better insurance firms out there. Cheaper ones. Ones who’re more likely to insure you. 

HOWEVER…. Primerica is far from the worst deal out there. 

Normally, at this point in my reviews I’m at that NO NO NO stage. We aren’t really there with Primerica. Does that mean I’m ACTUALLY recommending them? 

Well, I wouldn’t got that far. 

But there are a lot worse out there, believe me. 

The thing is, there are also a lot better. 

Like Local Lead Generation. I’ve been getting more and more involved in that recently. It’s super easy, and a great way to make some real bank. Even Buck could do it. That means you could too. 

Is This One of the Best World Financial Group Reviews Around? Read it Now to Find Out.

Growing up, I always wanted to be a stock trader. You know, like on Wall Street. 

 
Yeah! 

I was gonna have a $3,000 suit, a lambo, and a supermodel secretary. 

Problem was, I didn’t know the first thing about stocks. 

I started dabbling with some pocket money. I thought it was a good idea to buy the highest priced stocks. Because they were the highest, right? 

Duhhhh… Great logic, I know. 

Let’s just say it took me a while to realize that wasn’t necessarily how trading stocks worked. 

But at least I had a taste for it. I was young, bro. I couldn’t help it. 

At least I was keeping the dream alive. 

Actually, my uncle was involved in Wall Street for a while. 

These guys were living the dream I wanted. 

I managed to do some work experience there. 

This was back in the 90s, so the internet was still in it’s infancy. 

People were buying and selling stocks over the phone and shiz. I know, crazy right? 

Anyway, I soon learned that regular stock trading wasn’t as glamorous as I’d thought. 

My uncle had been in the game for a decade and still didn’t have a Lambo. 

He had a Buick. 

 
Okay, I’m not hating on Buicks. Stable car. No hate here. 

But his secretary…. definitely not a supermodel. 

But hey, why am I being so negative? 

It was still a cool week of work experience. 

 
Only those parties and cocaine-fuelled nights. They didn’t really exist. 

Not at this firm, anyway. 

Ain’t nothing wrong with a Buick! 

I guess the glamour of becoming a Wall Street trader was kinda wearing off. 

Most of the time they were just studying graphs and making phonecalls. It wasn’t very high-octane. 

 
So when I was choosing my majors, I kinda went in a different direction. The Wall Street dream had died down a bit. But I still respected that as a profession. I knew one day, when I had a bit more money, I’d like to get back into stocks. Not as a way to have a high-octane career. But as a way to actually grow my savings. 

I actually got more into the internet marketing side of things over the next few years. Let’s just say this wasn’t always easy, either. No sir. 

I failed a lot, but eventually started getting some success. 

That was with Local Lead Generation, which I’m gonna tell you more about soon. 

What did this success mean? It meant I had more money lying around. 

Yeah boy! 

No, not Lambo money. Bummer. 

But at least I was starting to thing about investing it. Helping it grow a bit more. while I took care of the day-to-day stuff. 

That’s when I started hearing about the World Financial Group. I liked the name. Sounded grand and legit. Was it? Hmm… check out this World Financial Group Review to find out. 

It’s one of the more legit World Financial Group reviews you’re likely to find. After all, I know if you banged “World Financial Group review” or “World Financial Group scam” into Google you’ll have seen a lot of spam there, 

Some of that stuff is there just to convince you that World Financial Group is legit. They’re trying to sell you it. 

 
I’m not trying to sell you it, so you can read my review with a bit more peace of mind. 

World Financial Group Review 

So as you know, I was looking for somewhere to invest my money. I wanted some advice, so I chatted to some WFG advisors. 

I soon learned that apart from giving me the financial advice I wanted, WFG was actually a way that I could make more money. It was a marketing opportunity. 

 
I was always on the lookout for more marketing opportunities. I liked to hustle online. So I saw this as a great way to learn a bit more about the financial world (like I’d always wanted to) and hopefully make even more money on the side. 

Did I make any money with World Financial Group? 

Short answer… No. 

Long answer… Nooooooooooo. 

You see, I soon learned that if it looks like a pyramid, sounds like a pyramid and smells like a pyramid. It’s a pyramid. 

That’s right, a pyramid scheme. 

I’d learned long ago to avoid these things like the plague. 

“But wait! Aren’t pyramid schemes banned?!” 

Yeah, they are. 

“So how are these people still operating?!” 

Well, they manage to get around this by calling themselves Multilevel Marketing opportunities, or MLM. 

Now let’s get this straight. Not EVERY MLM is bad news. In fact, some of them are super cool. They’re generally a way of promoting products through a network, and qualifying for a different level of commission depending on what level of the network you’re on. 

The main problems start for two reasons. 

One, if they make you pay to move up levels. 

Two, if the products at the bottom of the pyramid are completely worthless, scammy or way overpriced. 

 
That’s my main gripe with pyramid schemes like this. What’s the actually products you’re supposed to be promoting like? 

Well WFG promoted a number of different financial products. Things like financial advice, insurance, etc. 

 
All good so far,. 

But the main way they do it is with pushy sales pitches. And by recruiting sometimes-desperate “advisors” who’re more like salespeople than actual advisors, 

Actually, that’s where things first start falling down. 

Their main business model is recruiting students and other people without much experience in the working world. They show some flashy cars, expensive suits and entice the sort of people who aspire for that sort of life. 

 
Kinda like the life I aspired to before I grew up. 

These salespeople are referred to as associates. That’s because it sounds less pushy. 

Like this…. Only internet-based. 

 
But the sales pitch they’re encouraged to give is REALLY pushy. 

And get this—you gotta pay $100 for the opportunity. 

That’s right, to become an associated you gotta stump up the cash before you’ve even made any money. 

As I soon learned form some guys who’d been in this for a while. Some of them never made that $100 back. 

This was NOT the money-making opportunity I was looking for. 

 
It wasn’t really the financial advice I’d been looking for either. 

Very few people were actually making money here. The only real way to make money was to recruit more associates under you. Like all good pyramid schemes. 

What a bummer. 

I was disappointed. 

But I was also determined to finish this review so that guys like you could have a bit more info. And so you could know whether World Financial Group was really for you. 

The only real people making money from WFG are the top guys in the pyramid. That’s WFG themselves or the early adopters. 

It’s a bad deal for advisors, especially if you didn’t get in early. It’s also a bad deal for buyers, who’re charged exorbitant prices for stuff that isn’t actually that great. 

Listen, if you’re sitting there thinking that the WFG is a completele scam, it isn’t. They do have financial products and some of these are actually worth SOMETHING. 

But they’re worth a lot less than you’ll pay for them. 

If you want to get into the World Financial Group to make money as an advisor. Don’t bother. It’s as simply as that. There are better ways to waste your time and money. There are even better pyramid schemes. 

The main gig is basically recruiting more advisors under you rather than actually selling products. This leaves the people at the bottom vulnerable. 

You’ve also got to keep recruiting every 30 day period to maintain your level or get promoted. This keeps the pressure on at all times. 

It’s simply not a fun way to work. 

 
I’d already chatted to a few advisors who had recently left the company. I didn’t blame them in the slightest. WFG wasn’t a cool gig. 

It’s always super fishy when the only real way to make money is by convincing more people to become salespeople. That’s how the dodgy pyramid schemes really work. 

It means those at the bottom who’re just trying to sell the actual financial products can’t really make any money. 

And believe me, hardly anyone was making money with this stuff. 

It was enough for me. I can’t recommend World Financial Group. 

 
Is it a scam? Maybe. Is it worth it? No. 

There are far better ways to make money online these days. I’ve tried and failed at a few of them, but I also know that Local Lead Generation is one of the best new ways to make real income every month. I even got a few of those former WFG advisors involved. They were glad I did. 

You will be too. Check it out as soon as you can. 

Check Out This ACN Review to Find Out If It Can Really Make Money For You

I jumped into ACN so you don’t have to… 

I remember a few years back, when my buddies were on a big health drive to try and get back in shape. There’s nothing wrong with that.So when I first started hearing them talk about ACN, I thought it was part of that.”Hey bro, you tried ACN yet?””Yeah man, I couldn’t stomach the taste. Too sharp for me.””Wait…. What?” 

No… Not that. 

I thought they were talking about Apple Cider Vinegar. Ha! I know there was a lot of hype in the health and supplement world about that.”Haha! Bro! Not Apple Cider Vinegar, ACN! The telecoms company!”Oh… Right. No, I hadn’t tried ACN yet. But the amount they’d been talking about it, I thought I needed to give it a try. After all, my boy Bud had just bought a new motorboat thanks to ACN. Months before, he could barely afford to pay rent, so that got my interest for sure.Over the next few weeks, I dived into ACN. It was quite a journey. In this ACN review, I’m gonna tell you my story about how it all went. Then you can decide if ACN is really for you or not. I might be bias, but I think this is one of the best ACN reviews around. 

Bud’s boat. 

And remember, this was a while before I found a real legit way to make money online—and that was with Local Lead Generation. I’ll tell you more about that in a bit. But first, you wanna know about ACN…ACN ReviewOkay. We’ve got this far and you still don’t really know what ACN is, right? That was me, too.ACN stands for American Communications Network. This was much harder to find out than it should have been. Oh, and they aren’t just American, either. There’s an ACN Europe Division. Actually, my research into ACN threw up quite a few people in the UK as well as the States promoting ACN.They’re a telecom company. Ok. Got it. They sell phones, landlines, video-call software. Stuff like that. When I found this out, it was something I could get behind. I knew I’d be trying to sell their products, and I’d already done a bit of affiliate marketing myself so I knew how important knowing about your niche is when trying to promote stuff like that. I used phones, right? I was sure I could sell them.Only the more I learned about ACN, I soon realized that this wasn’t standard affiliate marketing. It started smelling a bit more fishy. And I started to doubt these “products” I was selling.The first rule of sales is to believe in your product. 

I made that up, but I think it makes sense. 

And if you can’t believe in your product, you’re gonna have a hard time selling it. I soon starting doubting both my products AND the way I was expected to sell them with ACN, and that’s not great. But we’re jumping ahead. Let’s start at the beginning. 

And oh yeah. I STILL don’t know what ACN actually stands for. Your guess is as good as mine. This sort of info simply isn’t that easy to find. It should be, shouldn’t it?When I first enquired about ACN I was introduced to this guy who was gonna be my “upline mentor”, Colin. I didn’t really know what this meant. I was expecting someone who was actually employed in an official position at ACN, but this guy just seemed like someone who’d got involved with the system a bit earlier than me. He actually told me that he’d tried a few other MLM schemes before settling on ACN.This set a few alarm bells off in my head. 

I hadn’t heard much about ACN by this point, but I HAD heard about MLM. I thought that meant a pyramid scheme. So I asked Colin about it. His answer was a bit vague. Was ACN a pyramid scheme? 

I soon did a bit more research myself and found out that not ALL MLM schemes are as bad as those pyramid schemes that you see in the news. MLM stands for Multilevel Marketing and it CAN be a legit way to promote things. But wasn’t always. Was it gonna be legit with ACN? I was soon gonna find out.So first I had to go to this meeting. I was suspicious, but willing to give it a go. 

There was a wide range of people there, some of them were pretty cool. 

But here’s one other thing… Some of them had been told some pretty wild tales to get them there. One guy thought he was just showing up to look at some luxury cars, and now they had him sitting down listening to a sales pitch. He wasn’t happy.Anyway, at this meeting—we all learned a bit more about ACN. But only a little bit.There was a bit of a hard-sell to sign up straight away. We were told it was a limited offer. So i jumped in.A few weeks later, I heard they were doing the same “limited offer” to a bunch of other people. Seems like that’s just a tactic. They do it every month. Not good.Anyway, back to the meeting. We’d be selling a range of telecoms products. But in order to “qualify” to sell them, we had to buy them first. 

More alarm bells.What?No affiliate marketing network I’d ever signed up to made me actually buy the product before I promoted it.But I thought I’d give it a go anyway as the video-phone looked pretty cool. I signed up to a $40 plan. Not cheap, but I thought I’d be rolling in more sales soon enough. 

I was wrong.And oh yeah… the phone didn’t really work. I tried getting them to fix it, but to no avail. I was stuck paying $40 a month for a product I didn’t really want. One that didn’t really work properly either. I was starting to feel a bit less happy about trying to promote this product, too.Remember that rule I made up? Believe in your product. I didn’t believe in this.So the first people I was gonna sell it to were friends and other people I knew well. As soon as my phone broke, I realized I didn’t wanna promote it to people that already trusted me. This isn’t a great business model, is it? I didn’t feel THAT happy about promoting it to people I didn’t know, either.Kinda like this  

Then we got to what ACN was REALLY about. Recruiting more salespeople. I told Colin I thought this was a marketing deal where I was gonna promote the product.That’s when he broke the news. The real way to make money is to recruit more salespeople. 

Oh… you mean like a pyramid scheme?I soon started wondering if ACN was just a network of affiliates, or sales reps. Colin had recruited me, and got a cut from my signup fee. I was gonna get a cut for anyone I recruited. They’d each be buying a phone to “qualify” and then probably not selling any more. The only way to sell the phones was to convince more sales reps to sign up.The biggest problem I had with this was the quality of the product. And what happens to the people at the bottom of the pyramid who didn’t manage to sign anyone up? 

At the moment, that person at the bottom of the pyramid was me.And then I remembered some of the people at the first meeting about ACN. Some of these guys were pretty desperate for money. I didn’t like the idea of convincing more people to be a part of this thing. 

Especially when they told me the best place to start was with my close circle of friends. There was no way I was gonna be involved with getting these guys into a pyramid scheme. 

Yeah, I know a few of my buddies were going on about ACN before. But that was just a select group of guys who’re always involved in some scheme or another. I wasn’t about to promote this to my OTHER pals.They wanted me to set up my own meeting. Like the one I went to. They even suggested I made up a bullshit reason for the meeting OTHER than ACN—to get people to turn up.At this point, I was out.But I still wanted to know more about ACN. I wanted to know how my buddy bought a boat. I wanted to know if I’d jumped off that boat too soon.So I did some more research. I actually went to one of the meetings that was arranged by a guy I met at my first meeting. Just to see how it went.It didn’t go great. Half the people there thought they were coming to a pool party.They weren’t happy when it turned into a sales pitch. Most of them left. The guy who set the party up didn’t seem happy either.That’s why I recommended he got some real affiliate marketing training from one of a number of different legit online courses. There are real ways to make money and be your own boss, but ACN doesn’t seem like one of them. He just needed pointing in the right direction. He needed to look for some real internet marketing training. A few months later, I’d heard he’d done just that. He was much happier now.The ACN ScamIf you got here, you’re probably wondering if ACN is a scam or not, right?Look. It’s not great. I don’t like calling ANYTHING a scam, especially as I ducked out super-early. But it’s not a cool deal for anyone. It’s not a cool deal for the people buying the phones, or the people trying to promote them.My opinion on MLM schemes like this is that as long as the product is good, there’s nothing wrong with a few people up and down the line making money promoting it via a network. But if you’re trying to trick people into buying a piece of crap, and the only way to really make money is by increasing the size of the sales-rep network, then it’s not great. That’s really just a pyramid scheme. I went to a few more of these “meetings”. Sometimes there were guys there who’d done a bit better out of ACN. One of them turned up in a real flash car. When the meeting didn’t go well and most people left (like always), this guy told us not to invite anymore broke people. Nice. Not.I wasn’t a fan of the hard sell, and I wasn’t a fan of their “product range”, either. Or their marketing practices. I’m not gonna tell you that you can’t make money with ACN. You can. But if you ask me whether there are better ways—then yes, there are. If you’re using predatory practices to sell stuff that doesn’t have much value to people who don’t need it—then there are definitely better ways. 

It’s not a scam in the “they’re gonna run off with all my money” kinda way. They DO have products. But as a money-making idea, it’s not great. And it won’t leave you feeling too happy. Or with too much money. 

But what about guys like Bud? Bud had got lucky. He got in at just the right time. He was at the top of the pyramid. Guys like me and the other people I met didn’t have it so good. 

But get this, even Bud stopped with ACN a few months later. Even he’d realized that it wasn’t as great as he first thought. 

At least he got a boat out of it. 

This all happened a while before I’d found a real way to make actual money online with Local Lead Generation. This idea was legit, and it was a way to own a slice of virtual real estate, where I could start collecting monthly rental checks quickly and easily. You should check out Local Lead Generation too.